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Posts by Inkling

I doubt these are "automotive model years." Intuit's big hat is in banking rather than cars. Intuit is playing a marketing game that's a bit deceptive. Date software a year ahead, and to the more naive consumers it won't seem to age as fast. Someone who might buy this same software in early 2016, a year and a half from now, will think they're getting a up-to-date product. They won't.   Personally, I wonder if Intuit has a grudge against Apple or if they're just stupid....
Given that I don't use any of the apps that Apple stripped back, I'm probably not the best one to attack that way. Besides:   1. Apple did get flack for that, lots of flack. Intuit deserves the same.   2. With the exception of FCP, the Apple apps being mentioned are either free or cheap. Quicken 2015 is neither.   Did you notice that this is Quicken 2015? It's still 2014, merely August in fact. That suggests that Intuit doesn't intend an actual 2015 upgrade. So don't...
Intuit can't even offer feature parity with the Mac version from seven years ago much less the current Windows version. It's easy to suspect there are executives at the company who want this product release to fail.
Sounds way too complicated to be practical and perhaps designed a bit too much for complete idiots. Much better to just take a few pictures. Get one of the parking level and parking spot number. Take another showing your car as it appears from some key location like the elevator or parking lot entrance. Heck, there's probably an app for that. Apple and the rest of the tech industry are missing one the best bets for urban location--inserting tracking data and timing...
Quote: "[Amazon] proposed a temporary arrangement in which sales would resume, but profits would be given directly to the writers, cutting Hachette out of the loop until a new agreement was reached." There's perhaps no better illustration of the narcism that reigns supreme at Amazon than that proposal. Amazon's investment in the books it sells are microscopic. Even for a well-detailed bestseller, they likely to be no more than $100 or so to create that book's webpage. In...
I've got mixed feeling about whether a hospital version of this would make sense or not. * On one hand, having a baby's movement, heart rate and temperature continuously monitored would be great. Those are the things I checked on every four hours. Watching them more closely, especially temperature spikes in immuno-compromised children, would be quite helpful. This'd also be much cheaper than the standard heart and respiration monitors that hospitals use. * On the other...
Given their huge market share, Apple could easily have several models of iPhone and make everyone happy, including one with longer battery life and a sport model that can manage life in the outdoors. It's ridiculous that Apple goes to so much trouble to create a beautiful iPhone but, because of limited battery life or ruggedness, many have to cover those good looks with someone else's case. I really do think Apple's design team could come up with several attractive models.
Ah yes, another tiny bit of justice is slipping into politics. Apple tilted very heavily toward Obama in 2008, with Steve Jobs (according to Isaacson's biography) offering to help with the campaign. What's the result? Amazon managed to get the Obama administration DOJ to go after Apple and the major publishers. That's classic Chicago-machine politics. Color Apple's executives stupid on that. When you are dealing with Chicago politicians, you pay protection money/services...
A half-million new jobs? What ad agency did Apple hire to come up with that claim--or perhaps it came from one of their lawyers. Both groups play fast and loose with the truth. A job is full-time, providing enough income to support one's self and a family. It also often comes with benefits attached. What Apple is talking about is "work," or more accurately occasional work. Selling apps is for most developers like a teenager who picks up a little money in the summer mowing...
Sigh, any mention of Adobe seems to bring out the subscriptions-over-my-dead-body crowd. Maybe buying is best for them, but it isn't for me. I've got a Creative Cloud subscription and I'm delighted with it. I use Adobe's apps to make a living and it's easily worth that monthly cost to get updates quick rather than wait for those drawn-out 18-month upgrades. If I save a couple of hours a month, I've more than paid for the cost. That I easily do.
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