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Posts by Maury Markowitz

But even if it does, so? People didn't ignore the Storm because of the screen. They ignored it because it was trying to be an iPhone without having any useful features. THAT problem they didn't fix, yet. Maury
Not to rub salt in that wound, but the situation up here in the GWN really is pretty good. Rogers/Fido has the exclusive now, but that's OK because their service is nothing short of spectacular. I have to drive at least an hour outside of Toronto before I lose 3G. Oddly, my GF's house is one location where I sometimes do.But if that were not enough, the other two major carriers, Telus and Bell, are both scared crapless that the Olympics meant everyone that visited with a...
Indeed. So this is going to hurt Apple eh? How, exactly? Let's just gloss over that one. Moving on, we'll instead note that Nike also withdrew (sort of), and concoct a conspiracy about the board members. Uhhhh, OK. Note that the other companies involved, like Pacific Gas & Electric, PNM Resources and Exelon, have no obvious connections at all, which basically blows that theory. Then, after noting that the companies are withdrawing over their stance on climate change, we'll...
Motherboard complexity is related. Right now you might have a case that can have up to four drives. Maybe a user will want three DVD's and a single big HD, or maybe three HD's and a a single DVD, etc. Since you don't know, you need to put on four of each connector, for a total of eight. That's in spite of the fact that you can only physically add four drives. With a new connector that runs both, you need four connectors total. So the MB space used up goes down. And since...
I've been watching this issue for some time and I'm convinced that Apple can offer 90% of the experience for 10% of the work. The one set of "backgrounding tasks" that people want are simply plug-ins for the iPod player. This takes care of all the radio-like and other streaming issues. These strike me as relatively easy. Another set are the interactive editors so you can make a quick reply to a text message, etc. These too seem very easy. Another set are "I'm on the...
Finally found a useful image: http://www.engadget.com/2009/09/26/e...ntel-could-be/ Note that the connector shown in the Intel press documents is visible on the inside of the case, just to the left of the Apple logo (pasted on top). The controller has several fibres leading from it, and one of those curls around into the topomost of the four ports. That port is also connected to a small PCB that clearly also includes power. So I think it's safe to say this is...
I couldn't agree more. Sadly, however, this article contains nothing of the sort. Do you see any "context" other than bland generalities about unrelated topics, or "history" about anything related to THIS topic? I see neither. After three pages we're left with a single block of text about the actual topic, one that merely regurgitates the existing press feed. Can you find a single statement about Light Peak that isn't copied from another source? If I want the Wikipedia,...
Well all I can say for sure is that the current connectors are all-optical end-to-end. This is a problem because it's very easy to get reflections off the end of the cable if they don't meet really nice and flat. That's why TOSLINK cables are so tightly connected. In the case of the computer cabling I've used it's typically two fibres ending in this big plastic block. The connector is surprisingly large, oddly shaped and flimsy. It's terrible industrial design. I can...
> if Light Peak's economies of scale drives down the price of optical cabling as expected > doesn't this effectively solve the Telcos "last mile" bandwidth problem? Sadly, no. Light Peak is a different kind of fibre, and the kind of fibre the telco's/cableco's use is already pretty much free. The cost in the last mile has nothing to do with the cost of the fibre and everything to do with digging up the last mile. You have to send out real humans to run the stuff, and...
I always shudder when I see a technical article on Insider, because they are almost always wrong. At some point I always conclude that the author doesn't really understand the technology they're talking about. The analysis articles, like this one, are equally wrong headed. After THREE PAGES of bogus filler brushing over ancient history, the author finally gets around to actually talking about Light Peak. And what does he say? Nothing that wasn't in the briefs sent out...
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