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Posts by shamino

 Not necessary is different from not wanted.  You can run every app available today in 1G, because developers aren't going to release something that requires more RAM than any customers have.  But "necessary" is a pointless benchmark, because those same developers would certainly take advantage of more RAM if it was available.  My guess is that they don't think it's likely to be needed. With a phone, you can expect people to have it with them at all times, so it's not a...
 Or in taking existing tech and making it convenient enough that people want to spend money to use it. The iPod is the perfect example.  People were ripping and trading MP3s for a while, and there were already some portable MP3 players.  Apple's big innovation was the scroll-wheel (which later became the touch-wheel and then click-wheel) and tight integration with iTunes (which was previously only used for rip-mix-burn and playing music from your computer.)  Those two...
  I think it is.  ARM is a fairly clean design without a lot of legacy baggage to keep porting forward. x86, on the other hand, needs to maintain (mostly) software compatibility with all of its old antiquated operating modes like real-mode (8088, 80186), 16-bit protected mode (80286), and all of the various 32-bit modes from the 386 forward.  Supporting all of that, along with modern high-performance requirements makes every successive generation a particularly nasty...
The mention of elevation data got me thinking. Can the GPS chip in an iPhone return 3-space data (that is, altitude) or is it only capable of returning ground-based coordinates? Simple math shows that it requires a minimum of three satellite fixes (and I think good GPS chips usually try to use four or more, in the name of error correction) to uniquely identify a single ground-based coordinate (three intersecting circles.) It requires a minimum of four satellites...
 No.  Companies don't do business with these nations because it is prohibited by Federal law.  The ITAR regulations prohibit the sale of (among other things) devices that include strong cryptography.  Apple couldn't sell to these nations without making a stripped-down device lacking all of the prohibited hardware and software, which would probably cost more than it's worth. But plenty of companies do make stripped-down tech products for sale to these countries.  For...
 I was in Beijing a few months ago.  Google still redirects to the Hong Kong site.  And the site is censored.  I don't know about any warning message.  But this is no secret - everybody there knows that it is censored.  And what's the alternative?  Violate the law and risk getting kicked out of the country altogether? You and I might be willing to risk this, but no corporation wants to risk that level of punishment in order to make a political statement.  There are...
Yes. And also note that it has been nearly 10 years since the date Apple allegedly began infringing on this patent. Why no legal action until now? Surely, the "inventor" knew of iPods before this year.It is typical for patent trolls to do nothing for years, waiting for the amount of alleged infringement to grow as much as possible, and then sue just before the patent expires (it's been about 15 years since the original patent's filing - anyone know how many years it is...
The service works great, but it unfortunately interferes with Game Center achievements if you are trying to share a session between iOS and Android.   For example, if I complete a world on Android, and the play on iOS, it shows the world completed, but the achievement (which does not exist on the Android version) does not appear in Game Center.  In order to get the achievement, I need to logout from my Rovio account (which reverts your progress to only that which was...
The presence of a chip doesn't mean it's "authentication". It may be a tranceiver, much like the chips in Thunderbolt cables. It might also be doing protocol conversion, to allow lots of different features to share the same 8 pins on the phone side of the cable. I agree that this chip is (at least initially) going to make the cables expensive, but unless the author has tracked down the chip's model number and identified it as authentication chip (which isn't mentioned...
Is that actually what they're claiming?  That Intel and Qualcomm's licenses don't cover system integrators that buy the Intel/Qualcomm chips?   If they're trying to make that point in court, they may find themselves countersued by Intel and Qualcomm.  Surely, they wouldn't sign a licensing contract that prohibits them from selling their chips to third parties, and if they were conned or coerced into signing such a contract, they're going to fight hard against any attempt...
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