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Posts by shamino

I wonder how close these copies actually are.   When I was in China on a business trip a few years ago, I saw stores full of counterfeit Apple products, but the cloning was skin-deep.  The devices were actually Android devices in a case that looks like an iPhone/iPad case, and with a skin that looks very similar to iOS at first glance.  Nobody purchasing them were ever under the impression that these were Apple products - they thought Apple's look was fashionable, so...
 I don't doubt anything you are saying here, but I don't think it is fair to compare Apple's R&D with Samsung's. Apple has a long history of innovation.  They are also well known for sitting on a promising new product until they decide it is useful and ready.  They almost never ship a half-baked hardware product in order to claim "first" or something similar. Samsung, on the other hand, doesn't innovate much of anything.  They have some very good semiconductor fabrication...
 I agree that these are important considerations, but I think it is safe to assume that Apple will be aware of them and develop/license/buy an appropriate solution as a part of any product.  They're not going to slap a few random parts together and ship a product that doesn't work.
 It will be interesting to see how much they can pick up on.  My wristwatch (a Citizen EcoDrive model) has built-in solar charging.  The face is transparent to certain wavelengths, which charge the battery.  In this case, a watch doesn't use a lot of power, so ambient lighting can keep it powered.  A few hours outside in the sun can fully charge a drained battery in a few hours. I wonder how much power a keyboard, mouse or trackpad might use.  It may be low enough to use...
 That sounds similar to my story.  I used an Apple ][+ at school, but due to budgetary concerns, my parents bought me a TRS-80 CoCo (and a cassette recorder to save my programs to!).  $300 for the CoCo was far better than the $1000+ that an Apple was going to cost. That CoCo was superior to the ][+ in quite a large number of ways.  The 800kHz 6809 was faster and easier to program (in assembly language) than Apple's 1MHz 6502.  Superior sound (6-bit analog, vs. a 1-bit...
The "6>6" slogan reminds me of one from the 90's during the UNIX marketing wars.   BSD had advertising posters featuring their daemon and a caption of "4.3 > 5.4", meaning "BSD version 4.3 is better than AT&T System V r4".  I still have one of these posters hanging in my office.
 As with anything, we'll find out when these things ship, but the description seems perfectly valid.  Boost converters have been around for a long time.  I had an ancient cassette recorder with one built-in, so it wouldn't slow down as the batteries wore out, but would instead work perfectly until the battery completely died, at which point it would suddenly stop. Quote: That's what the article describes. The only "gotcha" I can think of is that with such a device, your...
 Ugh.  And in true Android fashion, they took a relatively simple interface and loaded it up with so many confusing options that you need to be a systems engineer in order to figure out how to do anything with it. And they're promoting it for phones and tablets.  Because as we all know, if an interface works well on a 1" screen, it will have to be even better on a 12" screen.  I wonder how long before people start promoting it for ChromeOS - because it would be even more...
 Size is the key factor here, not price.  That phone you linked to is huge.  The dimensions are (3.98 x 1.81 x 0.47 in) - nearly a half-inch thick.  That's plenty of room to put an AM coil antenna. The coil you linked to doesn't have dimensions listed, but I would be very surprised if it could fit in any modern smartphone.  They're all much thinner than that 2008-era Sony/Ericsson model.
 Some frequencies (especially very low frequencies - VLF) can penetrate rock and ocean.  These can't carry a lot of bandwidth but they are used (for example) as emergency frequencies from submarines, since they can always get through to a receiver. Some (like AM radio) can bounce off of layers of the atmosphere, so you can often receive from a transmitter that is below the horizon.  Weather conditions can affect this greatly, however.  This is why (for instance) most AM...
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