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Posts by macarena

We are an app developer based in India, and recently, were contacted by MS to find out why we were not interested in developing apps for Windows Phone, what it would take for us to build apps for Windows, etc.   The reasons we told them - the insignificant number of phones in the market, and therefore the insignificant monetization potential, the cost of development tools for Windows, the fact that these tools require Windows 8 Pro and cannot run on regular Windows...
  Well, don't bet on Apple never getting back into the server farm space. When Apple abandoned Xserve, Xserve wasn't doing too shabby. They were selling decently, and prices were also not much higher that alternatives. Even if the volumes were not that great, I don't think there was much sense in Apple completely terminating Xserve, at a time when Apple was becoming more relevant in the enterprise, because of iOS.   There is more to this story than the general public...
  We are beyond the era where $400 is considered as a cheap phone. Around $300 you can now get a phone with a quad core processor, 2GB RAM, 16 GB Flash, Full HD 1920x1080 display, 3000MAh battery, and Android 4.2.2 (Micromax Canvas 4 expected to launch at that price/specs tomorrow). Even Samsung is seeing considerable pressure from these second rung Android phones that have got the spec comparison covered. Secondly, the $400 phone would be too close to the flagship iPhone...
We develop apps for both iOS and Android, but predominantly targeting the Indian market. I think the metrics for developed markets are totally different from those on developing markets, and there needs to be a study that targets developing markets as well. We have realized that paid apps just do not sell, even at $1 per app. On the other hand, free apps with advertising do relatively well. We are seeing much better monetization on Android via advertising, than we are...
At the end of the day, the entire case rests on two things.   - One, Apple's insistence that Publishers can price the books at any price they wish, but Apple should be able to sell at the same prices as the lowest prices the  books are sold anywhere.   - Two, Apple's insistence that this be done with an agency model, where it keeps 30% of the sales price of the books.   By itself, these two are not illegal in any way, shape or form. However, it had some...
This is going to be an epic WWDC - signaling major shifts in Apple policies.   - Apple TV gets major upgrade with iOS7. Native Apps. Ad Overlay mechanism - so Apple can provide content for free, and place targeted ads on the device - both when video is playing, as well as by pausing video periodically and viewing ads. Connect to Apple TV with your iPhone, and iPhone will display options for you to interact with the video/ad playing currently - whether you want to...
Taxes are riddled with such issues, that several countries have faced. There have been several innovative solutions to these issues, and these solutions have also been implemented in a large number of countries, with phenomenal success. For whatever reasons, the US stubbornly refuses to adopt these new tax paradigms.   Take the case of VAT - taxing the value added at each stage is now considered to be the fairest and most reasonable form of sales tax, which avoids...
This whole iTunes for Office swap that everyone is speculating on does not mean much.   Apple gets zero benefit from working on an iTunes for Windows 8 touch devices - there is insignificant marketshare for these devices, so Apple gains almost nothing from offering the product on Windows 8 touch. If this was just a case of recompiling the existing iTunes code to ARM, it would probably make sense, but Apple needs to do a lot more than that.   For MS however, not...
How is Google able to pass on this sort of data between apps? If there is such a facility, can it be used by smaller developers? Somehow this seems to be like pushing the envelope of what is "allowed" by Apple in iOS. If some smaller developer attempted something like this, Apple would shut him down in a heartbeat. I don't think we have heard the last of this yet.
The old pricing models, where people paid hundreds or even thousands of dollars for highly bloated software are on their way out. Earlier you had no choice but to buy software even if you needed just 20-30% of the functionality.   Today, with the AppStore model, there are thousands of options out there, that offer high quality software for free or for a dollar. With this sort of competition, the old companies. like MS and Adobe, look to compete by moving to...
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