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Posts by TenThousandThings

  Intel's production delays explain Apple's failure to put Sandy Bridge into the existing Mac Pro early last year. It also seems clear that a decision was made at that point to skip Sandy Bridge entirely and to not "play catch up" -- a decision that must have been made before Cook sent his post-WWDC 2012 email addressing "our Pro customers" indicating a 2013 Mac Pro redesign was in the works. It's hard to be sure about the basis for that decision, but it isn't hard to...
  If Dan is right, PCIe functionality will be pushed outside the box, via Thunderbolt. Apart from that, it's just the optical drive. Everything else stays inside, obviously. I would hope that Apple would not do this (move PCIe outside the box) unless anything that could formerly be added via PCIe can now, or soon will be, possible via Thunderbolt.   But you've definitely hit upon one limitation that early adopters will likely face. Dan doesn't point out the fact that the...
  Read the article linked: http://www.asymco.com/2013/04/16/escaping-pcs/   "The real problem for the PC vendors is not that they have such low margins–they’ve had low margins for decades. It’s that the volumes which made up for low margins are disappearing."   That's how. Apple's Mac volumes have grown steadily since the move to OS X. PC volumes have declined over that time, with the decline picking up speed recently as iOS and Android devices have cut sharply into sales...
  It's great to see Dan weigh in on this. There are few observers with a better sense of Apple's general direction than he, especially in relation to the rest of the industry. I think this is his core observation:     But I think what irks you is this:     So which is it? He doesn't really say. But if everything he mentions were implemented in a new Mac Pro, it would make for a radical departure from the status quo. To begin with, he suggests Thunderbolt will displace...
Notes on the past, present, and future of the Mac Pro   It is helpful to think back a bit to differences between the original 2006 Mac Pro and the current version. In 2006 [1,1 and 2,1], there was a single base model which could be customized via build-to-order options for its dual CPUs, graphics cards, and so on. This approach continued with the speed increase in the 2008 [3,1] -- one dual-CPU base model with a limited but intelligent range of BTO options.   In...
That advice ignores the possibility that one may have a significant investment in OS X software, and not just in terms of money -- Logic isn't hugely expensive, but there's also the learning curve to think about -- staying with what you know is not necessarily a trivial consideration. Switching can be a huge pain in the butt. Not to mention old documents that may not be compatible with whatever Windows application(s) one is switching to. It's not just a hardware thing.
  I'll take a stab at it -- I like a challenge -- this person in the music business bought a 27" iMac i5 for a good price through a friend with some sort of employee discount, replacing a 2008 MacBook Pro that was having trouble handling the work.   The plan was to use the iMac until a new Mac Pro comes out, but now he or she is having second thoughts about their choice, and is thinking about returning the iMac and getting a current MacBook Pro and using it with a 24"...
  Menzies' book had no peer review (serious or otherwise) -- it was and is basically a joke to anyone with training in the field, something he lacks entirely. Martin Powers is a whole 'nother kettle of fish. The phenomenon I was talking about has nothing to do with science and technology -- it is about cultural and political practices and ideals, an area China was far ahead of the rest of the world starting around the 11th century. The Manchu invasion in the 17th century...
  Weirdly enough, the last major borrowing by the West from 'China' is its intellectual role in the 18th-century English Enlightenment, which led directly to the principles enshrined in the Constitution of the United States. Don't laugh -- this is not a joke. Martin Powers of the University of Michigan was at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton in 2009 working on a book about this -- I don't know how close he is to finishing it, but it is a serious historical...
This is not like Proview, which was a loser for Apple from the start because of a basic mistake made by Apple's proxies in securing the rights to the iPad name. Proview's case (whether premeditated or not) simply exploited that mistake.   The new suit is very different -- the problem isn't the technical merits of the case, which obviously favor Siri and her origins. The problem is the Chinese legal system, and the fact that the central government's reach is not as...
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