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Posts by THT

In your two quotes from Anandtech, they don't state that the 3rd gen Apple TV, 3rd of the black puck version, has a dual core A5 with one of the cores fused off.They are stating directly that it is a unique A5 with a single core CPU and a 543MP2.The only version with the dual core CPU, but with one core fused off is the 2nd gen Apple TV, the 2nd gen black puck version.It's not like I didn't read the exact same passages last year.
You're mistaken. The 2013 AppleTV has special single core CPU, single GPU version of the A5 SoC. It's the thrird SoC since the first black puck version came out.It originally was an A4 SoC, then a 32 nm A5 with one of cores fused off or they cherry picked failed A5 SoCs that were going to go in the iPod touch or iPad mini 1st gen. The 2013 AppleTV has a special 32 nm A5 that is half the size of the prior 32 nm A5.There's no way they do that without getting rid of CPU/GPU...
My workplace bought a bunch of Apple TV devices for the conference rooms. No streaming media use here. Just used as wireless connectors to the projectors. It is like a gazillion times easier. And yeah, very likely to me that Apple has something like 15 to 20% margins on them. No more than $60 for the hardware and $25 for the cost of selling them. The 2013 Apple TV uses a single core Cortex-A9 CPU and a single SGX 543 MP1. It's like a 6x6 mm SoC. What, $5 per chip for...
 No way man. The 7th gen iPod nano is just a stretched 6th gen with a home button. The design language is basically identical between the 6th and 7th gen iPod nanos. They are basically extruded aluminum with an inset display with black border. The Nokia N9/Lumia is an evolution of the N8 with a "bulbous" design language. To me at least. iPod nano 6 and 7 gen devices are flat on the back. Lumia's are a little rounded. They still have a slight hint of the dog ear seen in the...
 It's in Apple's best interests to have multiple suppliers for their components. Eg, they have 3 for displays, and Samsung is one of them. The CPU is one of the few where they don't have multiple suppliers for a component, on their handheld, laps and desktop computers actually. If Samsung has a production 20 nm fab ready, go for it.
 I think of it from the outside in. If they are going to put a quad-core CPU into an iOS device, it's because they are going to ship FCPX, Logic X, Safari 7, etc, on it, not because there is TDP headroom or larger battery capacities. Adding another 2 cores (for a total of 4) only pushes performance for parallel or high throughput applications. These sorts of applications typically run for a long time (like transcoding a video). Safari 7 (or Chrome) type apps where each...
 I'll be sad if the quad-core rumor is true. It's a sign that Apple can't improve IPC much anymore, which isn't too surprising. Going the quad-core route won't benefit users as much as improving IPC. The last big low hanging fruit now will be using a SSD-in-a-package for storage. If they can't improve IPC around 50%, hope they'll have a turbo that can up-clock 50% to 70% for a couple of seconds. That combined with a 20% improving in IPC would get another 2x performance for...
I'm basically of the opposite opinion. The value of the band will stem from the sensor and the algorithms behind it. Sales of the hardware is where Apple will make its money. The display and data recording is the least valuable part of the value chain for Apple.The band doesn't even need to have a display. It'll make a measurement, store the data, then when the user wants to see it, it'll transfer the raw data to a paired iOS device, and the iOS device reduce, interpret...
 Yup. I'm tempted to say that they shouldn't announce nor ship the wristband device until glucose monitoring can ship with it. Having that will be an automatic win worth billions of dollars. Millions of units at $400 to $500 easy.
 The quote is from the investors.com article. It was there when I first read it. Well, I can agree and disagree with you regarding the "new math". It's just this analysts method for gauging the performance of phone makers. Some have a "+" sign in the net income column and some have a "-" sign in the net income column. You take an absolute value and add them all up and start taking percentages of the total. ;) It's not an uncommon method and has been used for awhile.
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