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Posts by THT

I've got some skepticism that TSMC will be able ship 14 nm parts in 2016, let alone late 2015. The foundry's definition of being ready is basically totally different from the expectation of when you'll see actual shipped parts.   There's been very little news on TSMC's readiness with 20 nm for 2014. There have been 2 SoCs announced that I'm aware of for 2014: the Snapdragon 805 (with 32 bit Krait 450 cores) for 1H 14 and the Snapdragon 410 (with 64-bit Cortex-A53 cores)...
 The only performance metric the Note 3 beats the iPhone 5S in is multi-core benchmarks and some GPU benchmarks, and barely at that. Meanwhile, the iPhone 5S's single threaded performance is about 40 to 50% faster. Single threaded performance lifts all boats. There are very few applications that can actually use 4-cores, and even less so on smartphones. And maybe you shouldn't use the word "bus" in the context of 64-bit either. Apple's SoC have used 32, 64 and 128-bit...
 Really don't agree with you that Samsung has any schematics or blueprints that give them any information. When Apple is working with Samsung Semi, Apple's SoC designers are figuring out how to fab the chip, to etch the transistors. Samsung Semi simply had no architecture information to glean from this type of work. If you are playing the espionage angle, then that automatically means Samsung design know anything about the architecture. They are only doing it for...
 Yes. All Exynos SoCs to date use CPU designs from ARMH and GPU designs from ARMH or ImgTec. Samsung does indeed have great SoC designers, but a custom design will be a whole new level for them. They appear to have plans to do a custom ARM CPU, but it would be 2015 before you see that. For 2014, if they can fit a Cortex-A57 into a smartphone TDP, they'll likely do that. Otherwise they stretch a Krait (Snapdragon 805) or a Cortex-A15. Their Exynos 5250, 5410, 5420 adventure...
 Yes. X-Gene, a micro-server 64-bit ARM part, was announced to be available on Oct 30, 2013. Using that date, Apple likely shipped 10m A7 SoCs before Applied Micro even took their first order. It's quite likely Apple will have shipped 50m A7 SoCs by end of 2013. Who knows how many Applied Micro will have shipped by Dec 31. Their product page still says "pre-order". As for smartphone SoCs, the linked article is likely right, at the earliest, the industry thought it was...
 And when Apple hands over the masks for laying out the transistors and metal layers on the wafer, what is the Samsung fab engineer seeing? They aren't seeing a blueprint. It's doubtful to me that Apple is handing over the circuit design or "blueprint" for the SoC. They are handing over circuit masks to etch the transistors. Apple and Samsung work to make sure the masks are designed correctly for the process involved, but I doubt that Samsung Semi knows at any point time...
 Is this really true? Windows compatibility is likely huge for things like enterprise desktops (where specific applications have been design to help the business run), but in the tablet space, we're talking consumer usage and office automation usage , right? In that space, those usages are becoming more and more web-based and office automation is becoming more and more commoditized. Microsoft's problems in tablets aren't really x86 SoC or legacy app related. I still think...
 They didn't have access to the A7 architecture, and none of it will be copied. At least for 2014 where most of the 64-bit CPUs will be Cortex-A53 on 28 nm, or -A57 if they have a 20 nm node ready in 2H 14. Most of the CPU designs will end up in the same place: 4-issue, OOE, lots of caches, dual and quad core, and on-die power regulator for active idle. A Haswell type architecture is just about where they are all heading.
 My hunch is that Intel's been suffering through some strategy tax or product segmentation tax for awhile. Obviously, Atom was created for Netbooks, so it naturally had to perform not as good as Core processors and relied on n-1 nodes to make them cheap. Then for 3 straight years, they tried to shoehorn the in-order core into a smartphone SoC. They got a couple of very minor wins (Razr i, Yolo), but I view those as more concept phones (read: concept car) then a serious...
 Maybe. I use 2 to 4 Watt to be safer, and it just feels more than 1 or 2 Watt based on the battery tests I've seen. I'm relatively certain you can burn down an iPad Air battery in 6 to 7 hours by turning the screen brightness down to the lowest setting (probably 1 to 2 Watts) and running a complex game or application. So, the SoC is probably hitting somewhere between 2 to 4 Watts. Lastly, 4 Watt TDP for the tablet is likely the limit due to skin temperatures, and it's...
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