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Posts by THT

  One more time. How do you know Amazon's eBook business was or is in the red? Then, how would you be able to tell in the future?   I don't think there's a problem whatsoever with Apple using the wholesale model for eBooks, and operating it at zero margin, just like Amazon is purported to do. The only problem is Apple's practice of always trying to make a profit, or at a minimum something just above break even like the iTunes store.   Was the DOJ lying about Amazon's...
  The DOJ declared that AMZN's ebook business is and was profitable. So, how are we supposed to tell the difference between then and the future?   Also, I said "zero margin" or "zero net profits". That doesn't mean a loss.
  Why not? That's the way their whole business is set up. They price to as close to zero margin or zero net profits as possible. Having someone else control prices is anathema to AMZN's modus operandi.
  The proposed remedy only bars agency contracts with the 5 major publishers. It doesn't bar wholesale contracts for ebooks. The DOJ remedy is telling Apple to use a wholesale model for eBooks and do it in such a way as to not raise ebooks price across the industry.   The problem for the publishers is that with the wholesale model, with Amazon employing their "zero margin" tactics, Apple can do the same. This nukes the publishers hardcover book sales, which is their...
Wow. The book publishers are a bunch of losers alright.
  Rhetorical question?   Predicting an Apple product will be in short supply for the first few weeks or months is not much of a prediction. You'd be 90% successful with the prediction by just saying the Apple XYZ product will be in short supply every single time.
  I'm asserting the DOJ doesn't understand the market forces involved, and are doing a disservice to consumers by choosing to go through this particular action.    1. Prices were not fixed. Prices were reset to a higher initial value yes, but they were subject to market forces and they came down. Didn't you see the graph by the DOJ? The one where there is a spike in the book prices? Sure, that is "price fixing" for all of about 1 month. The prices dropped immediately...
  Yes, the traditional big publishers are pretty much toast. They did it to themselves.   1. They saw the music industry get blindsided by digitization. It was inevitable for books to be in the same boat. This was over 10 years ago, and they had a long time to do something.   2. They knew Amazon was going to eat them alive, yet they became dependent on them, and didn't have the guts to break free. Amazon is notorious for getting the steepest discounts for wholesale book...
    The two quoted statements are not congruent.   As for rigging or price fixing, if the price is indeed fixed by the industry at one price, yup that's price fixing, but ebook prices from 2010 to 2012 were not fixed. They were going doing from their starting point, and probably would have continued to go down. Maybe not, I don't know, but the plots provided by the DOJ showed they were going down basically the whole time of the price fixing scheme.
  The DOJ is also not responsible for determining what prices should be either. With this court action, they are saying the market price for ebooks is $9.99, or lower. Prices rise and fall depending on market conditions, like a new entrant and different business model for the industry.      People say this like it is fact. Maybe it is true. I'd like Amazon to report it as such. There's a bit of doubt in my mind as Amazon rarely reports a profit. As such, it's easy for me...
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