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Posts by THT

No. The Pentium Pro/II/III/4/M only understand x86 instructions. The micro-ops are irrelevant. The translation has neglegible effects on performance, if not zero. The only thing it costs are transistors. In today's transistors, it's <1% of the total amount of transistors.
Yes. Performance-wise, there isn't going to that big of a difference though. So, there is not that much pressure to do so.
Heh. Apple may only use Pentium-M chips in all of the machines. The Netburst Pentium 4 chips will be no more in a year or so. Yonah will likely be the 1st Intel chip Apple uses for small form factor machines (laptops and Mac minis and iMacs). Then in 2007, they'll use Merom and Conroe. Yonah = dual-core Banias architecture Merom = next gen Banias type architecture (dual core) Conroe = high performance (high Watt) Merom (dual core) Merom supposedly will have 30%...
Software-wise, Apple and MS are on a level playing field with Intel. Apple's advantages are what they have been, Steve Jobs DNA. That is, Apple products will typically have taste and elegance in design, for the most part. MS's drawback is that they are so huge that they could suffer from bureaucratic rot and not adjust quickly enough. Like, if Longhorn is sufficiently gargantuan, MS will not be able to support new hardware features as quickly as Apple. Then again, everyone...
Oh, I think Intel is a company such that they are paranoid about what MS wants to do with the Xbox 360. MS is hedging on losing the software war with that box. Intel is hedging on losing 50 million possible sales to homes to Xbox/PS3. I think this is where Apple may come into the play. If MS makes a play for a convergence device with the Xbox 360 in 50 million homes, Intel will respond with some entertainment converged device as well. The PC and game console are...
Your URL stated "bring it into production in 2006," not the beginning of 2006. This is a 12 month window for their "on schedule" statement. Qualification on memory ICs is occuring 2H 05. I think AMD will be doing really well if they can deliver a 65 nm uprocessor in July 2006.With the same resources, one company will typically get something done faster than two companies in a partnership. However, that could be fine as you say. However, I'm negative on IBM's, and therefore...
The question is for 2006, 2007 and 2008, not necessarily today. Moore's Law essentially states that the number of transistors in semiconductor parts, microprocessors, doubles every 2 years. This is done by developing production facilities capable of producing smaller transistors every 2 years. This statement needs a 10000+ page book to explain because it involves virtually everything in the universe! I exaggerate, but it involves a lot of economics and physics. The reason...
Jobs' worst business decisions? In no specific order: o Not producing "Macintosh" on top of Apple II and MS-DOS o Hiring Jon Sculley o Positioning NeXT hardware in college level education market (should have been consumer and content creation) o Not transitioning NeXT 68k hardware to NeXT x86 hardware instead they made NEXTSTEP for Intel processors o Not realizing the power of WorldWideWeb.app and not creating NEXTSTEP based web servers The PowerPC -> Intel...
Dual-core Powerbook baby. My 500 MHz iBook, 256 MB RAM, is long past retirement, but it will need to last another year. I probably should get that 512 MB SO-DIMM soon. It couldn't even view the WWDC webcast. Poor geezer.
I wouldn't sweat the trust thing. In 3 years, there will be only 2 corporations in the world that will be able to produce 45 nm desktop chips. One of them will be Intel. The other one, I don't know, perhaps UMD+TSMC or Japanese/Korean conglomerate or IBM/AMD/Philips conglomerate. I'll bet that Intel will get their first, a year before the other companies will. IBM will be perfectly happy producing a 65 nm 3.2 GHz Cell and Xenon well into 2008, barely bothering to improve...
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