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Posts by rcfa

 You try to shift the argument by not quoting what I wrote my reply to. I fixed that issue, by including again the section of your original post that I was referring to. So let's look at what you wrote: "These activists are very selfish."  What activists? These are programmers who write software to prevent government snooping. In any reasonable country that's legal. I can encrypt and bypass NSA snooping as much as I want, while they try to break whatever mechanisms I use...
 I wouldn't be so sure about that. Having an official corporate presence in Taiwan that's distinct from doing business in (mainland) China is a tad too close for comfort to endorsing Taiwan as an entitiy distinct from (mainland) China.Doing business with a Taiwan-owned manufacturing company that does all the actual manufacturing in (mainland) China is different, because at least in theory, sooner or late Taiwan will be rejoined with (mainland) China anyway (so goes the...
 Yes, but the actual manufacturing happens in mainland China. There is an odd tension-yet-collaboration-yet-hate between the monied and political powerful elites of Taiwan and China. Unless you have at least a cursory familiarity with Chinese culture and history, what's going on between China and Taiwan is hard to understand. Imagine Yankees vs. Dixie, but with an odd mixture of ethical and cultural merits between both sides and a civil war that ended in a stalemate, then...
 The Taiwanese don't hate Apple. Many of the Taiwanese may not have enough money to afford Apple, but they don't hate it. They do hate, by and large, the mainland Chinese government. The reason Apple doesn't have retail stores in Taiwan is the same reason they removed the app from the AppStore: so-called "communist" mainland China (which is more like fascist mainland China) does not recognize Taiwan as an independent political entity and considers it a "rogue, secessionist...
 Americans do constantly things against the US government. Heck, even the US government does things against the US government, which is why we currently have a US government shut-down. It's called democracy, civil-disobedience, protest, riots, law-suits, etc. People use all the tools at their disposal, and then some, to make sure government doesn't go beyond it's limits.If none of that helps, people take up arms, engage in whistle-blowing like Ed Snowden, etc. So yes, as...
 Here we go: another one of the bloggers/internet posters paid by the Chinese government to spread their views and dilute the public opinion. Remember the recent micro-blogging disaster, when "people" were outraged at news before the news actually broke, because they were paid to post pro-government opinions and didn't bother to check if the news had actually happened already? Who cares what's good for China (read: the Chinese government and it's cronies)? What matters is...
The risk isn't big at all: it is forsaking doing business in a country run by a bad regime. It's common practice which is why Apple does no business in North Korea, Syria, Iran, Cuba...It's just that the US has grown so dependent on China and cheap imports that the US can't afford to take stance against the regime anymore. Difficult to oppose a regime that holds most of the US national debt and which could collapse the US economy with the equivalent of an economic nuke by...
 No, not like that. The person in the US would need to create a iTunes store account for the person in China and give that person the store credentials (AppleID, password) for the app bundle to be installable.  I don't equate internet censorship with death camps, but I equate one dictatorial regime with another. Nazi Germany was big on censorship, and China tortures, imprisons and kills political adversaries, engages in a systematic Han-ification process in Tibet,...
 It is a commercial decision to do business in countries with dubious human rights records. e.g. boycotting South Africa to end Apartheid was not a legal decision (at least at the beginning), but one to decide what's the higher value: some extra profit, or a cleaner conscience. Many companies at the time, some under pressure from customers, decided to forego the profits and withdraw from that country. But that was a different time, when a large proportion of the American...
I may point out that anything that happened in Nazi-Germany was according to the law.So why are companies to this day paying retribution for having followed the law?Because nobody is allowed to hide behind the law and chain of command if the laws run counter to basic HUMAN RIGHTS.There are more important values than corporate profits in this world.
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