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Posts by DavidW

 It's the same reason why I borrow money using my margin account rather than to sell some of my AAPL shares to get the money I need. If I had sold some AAPL in the beginning of last year, instead of borrowing the money, I would had lost out on 40% gain (not to mention the dividend) and have to pay capital gains tax on the sold shares. Instead, I paid an 8% interest. Interest that I can deduct to reduce my capital gains tax.  As long as I think AAPL will go up by more that...
  Well, as of today, MS has a market cap of about $350B. At it's peak in 1999, MS had a market cap of $6130B. So today, MS is only worth about 57% of  what it was worth in 1999. But adjusted for inflation, MS was worth $873B, so MS today is only worth 40% of what it was worth in 1999.  In 1999, Apple had a market cap of less that $10B. That's about $13B adjust for inflation. Today, with Apple having a market cap of $710B, Apple is now worth over 50X's ( that's a 5000%...
 And CD's would also sound great on such a system. But with all things being equal, the same system with a moderately priced turntable ($200 - $300) with a decent cartridge and a good CD player with a decent built in DAC (not a DVD player that plays CD's), most listener would still prefer the sound of the LP on a turntable. The reason why most listeners thinks CD's is the better sounding format is because most of their LP listening experience consist of listening to LP's...
 The thing is that if you paid an income tax to the foreign country in which you earned that money, you get a tax credit for the taxes paid to the foreign country and mostly likely will not have to pay any (or very little) US income tax on it when you declare that income here because in most countries, personal income tax rate is much higher than that paid in the US. There's also some regulation that if you were considered a resident in a foreign country for a full tax...
 False. No company can avoid paying US taxes on profits or income made in the US. That's tax evasion in the IRS books and they will get you for it. Even if it's a foreign company with a foreign HQ. Even if you're a multi billionaire. Corporations are only allowed to keep overseas profits overseas and not have to pay US taxes on it. But US  individuals are still liable for US tax on any foreign income.  And it doesn't matter if you re a billionaire on paper. You are taxed...
 That only pertains to the portion of overseas profits Apple made in certain EU countries. Because that's the way the EU sets it up. (and the EU is looking to changing that.) But are you telling me Apple was able to do this with profits made in China, Japan, Korea, India, Africa, Canada, South America and Australia? Countries whose corporate tax rate are most likely in the 20's. And I'm betting China will soon, account for half of Apple overseas profits. (I'm pretty sure...
 That might not be true. The amount of money Apple spends on their employees is tax deductable as a cost of doing business. This reduces the tax Apple has to pay to the Feds.  Dividends on the other hand is not a cost of doing business and is taken from Apple's profits, after taxes. But The Feds do gain in payroll taxes, but SS and medicare is not a real tax as the employees are suppose to get that money back when they retire in the form of SS check and health...
 That's not right. If Apple already paid 6.5% corporate tax abroad, they have to pay 28.5% if they want to bring that profit in to the US today. If this bill passes, all they would pay is another 6.5%. And really, it you look at the foreign corporate tax rate, Apple most likely already paid about 20% to 25% taxes to foreign countries. So their tax rate would only be about 10% to 15% if they brought that money back into the US...
 Paying 35% tax on the profits you make in the US is fair, considering all the infrastructures the the US supplies and were taken advanage of when making those US profits. But when profits are made overseas, very little of the US infrastructures were used to make those profits and thus those profit shouldn't be taxed at the same 35% rate. And really shouldn't be taxed at all, when brought back into the US to be spent here. 
 There's a difference between tax evading and tax avoiding. Evading taxes owed is illegal and the IRS will get you for it. Avoiding taxes is perfectly legal and the IRS can't do a thing about it. Moving profits made in the US to overseas account, without paying US tax on it, is evading taxes and illegal. Keeping oversea profit overseas to avoid paying US tax on it is legal. 
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