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Posts by Dick Applebaum

Aw, C'mon ... HomeKit is just over a month old -- not even Phillips had a Hue ready. The Wimoto is a Bluetooth 4.0 Smart device -- AKA, the Apple low-level BLE protocol. All Wimoto has to do is refresh (over BLE) their existing devices to add iBeacon protocol.There were lots of BLE devices which preceded theApple iBeacon announcement. There was a mad scramble to add iBeacon support so they could take advantage of the market defined by Apple.What Wimito does now is use...
mas o menos ...According to WWDC info: When you are at home using the iPhone, to control the HomeKit accessories, the app has to be running in the foreground ... Except, with HomeKit, you can set triggers, that automatically run in the background???Then, there is the claim that you can control your HomeKit accessories from offsite, using your iPhone via something they called Apple Connectivity. For example you could be at the office and set the air conditioning...
Wimoto wireless sensor system now offers motion detection and water sensinghttp://www.treehugger.com/gadgets/wimoto-adds-motion-and-water-sensors-wireless-sensor-system.htmlhttp://www.amazon.com/Wimoto-SEN001-Sentry-Bluetooth-Sensor/dp/B00ES5BJOO/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1405272518&sr=8-7&keywords=wimotoThere are other, similar devices in various stages of production/development ... they're coming!
There are 2 levels of protocols:The iBeacon protocol is as you describeThere is also a lower-level BTLE protocol which allows dialog between devices such as iBeacons and an iDevice.iBeacon protocol is built using BTLE protocol but does not expose the dialog API.An iDevice can concurrently run both protocols, and the interfaces are pushed down and aggregated at the OS radio level.The low-level BTLE protocol is used to setup iBeacons -- set the identifiers, temperature, time...
The device, you describe, with WiFi, an OS, AC Power ... could be an iBeacon in some environments like stadiums, airports, hospitals, etc.For the home, that same device would, more likely, be a hub or controller for WiFi Accessories, BLE accessories and inexpensive battery-powered iBeacons. The hub/controller can take advantage of what iBeacons can do easily and inexpensively ... determine inside/outside temperature, detect motion in the baby's room ...You get granular...
I guess they could ... but that would be battery draining, expensive and overkill. Rather, the iBeacons could communicate, using BTLE, with a hub or controller. The hub or would be slightly more expensive (Hue Hub, $99 AppleTV) and provide the interface between many iBeacons and the internet and private network.In an earlier response I mentioned the XCode HomeKit tool that Apple provides to setup and communicate with simulated accessories. When you setup a bridge like...
True, but there's more. The hardware in say, the iPhone, detects any iBeacon within range -- but ignores any identifiers that you aren't listening for. The addressing scheme provides for over 1 billion unique (addressable) devices sharing an identifier. Last I looked, you can listen for up to 20 identifiers -- or 20 billion unique iBeacons.Also true, but ... the App can be programmed to dialog with iBeacons ... low and slow. An inexpensive hub ($99 AppleTV) could...
The app is HomeKit.Status monitoring:  Some inexpensive iBeacons are quite intelligent. They can measure temperature, moisture, humidity, movement, etc -- and send that information to a central HomeKit Controller.Micro-Location Personalization:  With iBeacons spread around the house at known locations, your "you are here" sensor (iWearable, iWatch, iPhone, etc.) can determine where you are within a few feet by trilateration -- and send that information to a central...
I think the reason that the swift is pictures as flying downward is because it hunts insects from above.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swift
Citation?
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