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Posts by Dick Applebaum

Somewhere in storage I have a numbered original of this poster. It was [supposed to be] Apple Internal-Only and only 100 were made:
I don't think that's quite the way it happened.The network did run well -- but it wasn't really hacked -- at least not on the Apple ][. The Apple ][ encouraged 3rd-party interfaces and published the contents of their ROMS with instructions on how to use them. Later, Apple did the same with the Mac. AIR, this was true for IBM-compatible PCs, too!Corvus Omninet performed competitively with Ethernet and had significant cost and installation advantages.Since the Concept...
I never used it! As an IBM Dealership we were required to handle them in our computer stores.I don't think we sold many before it was discontinued.This particular PC/Jr kb was a display model. Mark Hahn *, bought the PC/Jr compute (didn't want the kb) t to develop a proprietary box/software to edit movies digitally. It mainly involved Titles and Wipes ... Kinda' like iMovie -- but this was in the 1980's.* Mark Hahn was a cofounder of Corvus and the technical genius...
You young whippersnappers ...Now, That's a chucklet keyboard!IR instead of BT and 4 AA batteries. 
While quite long, this is a very revealing evaluation of the advantages for both NoSQL and RDMS. It was presented prior to FoundationDB gaining popularity.Buried in there somewhere is a comment that some consider a major advantage to a NoSQL db is that there is no need for a DBA.Also he suggests that NoSQL can be used to advantage because of its immaturity -- to provide lower risk for quick-to-market business opportunities ...This reminds me of the success of VisiCalc in...
Yeah! IMO, Time Machine is one of the best Apple apps. IDK if they bought it or built it -- but it just goes along doing its thing.
Running Time Machine on a Mac the first time takes a lot longer too. But subsequent backups take a lot less time -- as they only backup changes since the last backup. And you can exclude portions of your file structure to start -- then add them in piecemeal, later.If Apple were to provide an iCloud Time Machine -- likely, they'd use a Percolate Up and Trickle Down strategy -- where as files are changed, they are backed up to the cloud -- and in the background is...
In the scenario you describe above:does each cluster contain the entire dbwhat is the maximum size of the cluster, the dbwhat is the maximum I/O (TPS) of the write mastercan these clusters be distributed to say LA, SF, NYC, etc.can you have more than 1 write masterSay, iCloud has millions of users with hundreds (or thousands?) of files each with hundreds or thousands of transactions per second.Can Postgres handle a database of that size? Can Postgres handle a tnsaction...
Why? The last time I looked At PostgreSQL it was non-distributable -- the entire db had to reside on a server, and if replicated to other servers, there was no way to interface them through the db constructs.FoundationDB handles this easily and supports SQL Queries -- though not a relational db.If iCloud has millions of users with hundreds (or thousands?) of files each -- IDK if any relational db or single server could handle this.
I would kill (well maybe just maim) to be able to install/test FoundationDB on my Mac -- using Swift, of course.Sigh ... I learned about FoundationDB when Apple acquired them & all downloads were removed from the FoundationDB site.I've been Playgrounding around with how to approximate the FoundationDB data structure -- an ordered Key/Value Pair.In Xcode you can do this by creating an ordered array that references an unordered dictionary.It appears to be quite flexible!
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