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Posts by Alfiejr

no, your iPhone/iPad is already your universal remote. you just need load the specific UI apps from the OEM's/services you use/have installed that control your various home technologies - security systems, built-ins, smart gadgets, whatever - usually connected to your wifi. they can already access your other core iOS info they need, like your location (and weather?), with your specific permission.  i have some of these, they work fine if well designed. there is certainly...
Actually, i question the entire notion of the 'integrated automated' home - if that is indeed what HomeKit is all about. is it really worth the trouble? in fact, for most of everyday life, old school manual/built it controls remain the easiest sufficient UI of all. they are located, of course, where the activity is happening - appliances for example. why bother to use an app or voice UI to deal with my refrigerator or dish washer? i still have to open the doors, move...
is this a serious question? the vast majority of business applications - the hundreds if not thousands of employee-facing proprietary softwares in widespread use - are Windows based of course. Google cloud Apps are essentially consumer services - popular, but unrelated to specialized, or even generic, business needs. they need customized client software on portable devices for employees that ties in to the programs they depend on back in the HQ. all those "modules" etc....
the first big question is, does Knox, even when properly implemented, actually provide the security that it purports to?   the second question is, if so, what are the trade offs?   the third question is, does it work well with today's typical enterprise IT setups and software?   but what is not a question is, when it comes to security:   first, no business or government in the world trusts Samsung - the world's #2 industrial espionage operation (after...
as many note already, Surface Windows on a small screen mini tablet is simply unworkable. W8 software designed, let alone optimized, to be usable on such a small screen simply does not exist. Nadella realized that the only possible format for that concept is a large tablet. and even that Surface Pro is not selling like hotcakes. but MS can keep it alive as their desktop OS Windows tablet "hobby" indefinitely.   Windows RT was meant by Ballmer to fill that smaller tablet...
 yes Gruber filed a very thoughtful post - "Only Apple" - about Cook and Apple on Friday: http://daringfireball.net/2014/06/only_apple his post is an infinitely better analysis of both than the drivel from the NYT hacks. the real question is what has happened at the NYT. did it all begin with the hack "stenographic reporting" by Judy Miller a decade ago that very much helped launch a totally bogus war that cost Trillion$ and a hundred thousand innocent lives? Arthur...
well i got the lower-price 40G PS3 when it was released a year later at the end of 2007. still works fine. got a few favorite games, but not at all a "gamer." for watching Netflix, i prefer it to my Apple TV because its on-screen UI is nicer and its candybar remote control is easier to use than the awful ATV remote. but its real advantage for me is Vudu, which ATV does not offer. that's the one streaming service with as many 3D movies for rent as Hollywood will allow to be...
so basically the PSTV is the Sony gizmo that will add backwards-compatibility to play PS3, PSP, etc. games on the (can't-do-that) PS4 - for $100 extra. well that's good no doubt for all the folks with a lot of those games (i don't see a DVD drive, so i guess it's just their cloud download games). of course you could simply keep your PS3 plugged in for free ... but hey, it's a new gizmo! that's news! but what this has to do, aside from the similarity in names and price,...
 yes. this actually reminds me of the "Mac-killer" Windows 95 launch back in the day, when MS co-opted many useful OS 7 UI elements it previously lacked (and Netscape's pioneering browser too) and used its "walled" enterprise PC lock-in (cross platform services/files did not yet exist) to push Apple and all others aside for the next 12 years. Now it's Apple's turn to do the same to Google (and Dropbox et al.) with iOS 8, centered on its ever growing, constantly improviing...
not sure the "analyst" quotes above are consistent with this article's headline - but the headline is, yes indeed, the real story yesterday:   - Apple finally added its own versions of the most popular features of Android that iOS previously lacked, taking that advantage away from Google.   - Apple is taking every opportunity, especially its newly prominent Spotlight search, to make using Google search unnecessary for common everyday needs, incorporating strategic...
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