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Posts by Socrates

Er... what? The iOS 3.2 SDK supported both iPhone and iPad, as does the latest 4.1 SDK. You've only ever needed one copy of the XCode tools to build apps for either iPhone or iPad or both. The beta unifies the OS version number for the two devices, and makes some of the iOS4.x API functions available for the iPad, but otherwise it makes little or no difference to developers. If you've been building your iPad apps with a different copy of XCode to the one you use for...
I didn't miss it, I just pointed out that if you make the pixels smaller then you make the interface elements smaller, and if you make the interface elements bigger then you need to redesign your apps. You may be correct that a drop from 10" to 7" wouldn't be an insurmountable difference, but it would still seem pretty odd for Apple to have an iPad model where the on-screen buttons were smaller than on the iPhone. Of course most things Apple does seem improbable until...
They'd look and work pretty much the same as a pixel-doubled iPhone app running on an iPad does now (only less pixellated since the iPad doesn't currently support the HD graphics in iOS4 apps). That would probably be okay, but I'm not sure what the benefit would be versus running the app on an iPod/iPhone. The pixels would be bigger but there would still be the same amount of content on screen. It might have a niche as an iPod for the hard-of-seeing, but I can't see a...
Of all of these, the 7" iPad seems the least probable. I'm an iPhone/iPad developer, so I have some experience with what's involved in programming these things. One of the key differences between iPhone and say, Android is that iOS has no real provision for automatically supporting different screen sizes. Porting from iPhone to iPad means redesigning your interface for a different screen size and aspect ratio. This isn't automatic - it requires a complete manual redesign...
It's important not to confuse Xcode (the development tool) with Objective-C (the language) and Cocoa (the API). Xcode 4 ships with the same versions of Objective-C and Cocoa as Xcode 3.x. That said, I believe I can answer your questions: - If you've never coded in Objective-C it's going to seem very weird compared to C#. It's fully object oriented and has the same concepts (methods, classes, single inheritance, interfaces (called protocols in Obj-C)) but the syntax is...
That isn't true at all. There's no sense in which Webkit's JavaScript engine uses Lua. If you're basing that off this then read it more carefully. One of the Lua designers worked on Apple's JS engine, and they share some optimisation techniques, but that's all.
Actually, well-designed single-vendor software is invariably better than committee-designed open source software.The two aren't mutually exclusive - Webkit is open-source and is brilliant, but it's brilliant because Apple developed it, not because they open-sourced it.Open standards are important for things like document formats or APIs, but closed software is usually superior because there's more money to be made from it which means more investment which means more smart...
What are you blathering about? The iPhone is already the industry standard smart phone, and the iPad will soon be the dominant tablet. You think CS5 was going to make one iota of difference to Apple's market success? It's Adobe's platform that will be (further) marginalised by this decision, not Apple's. And why would Adobe be happy that Apple has just blocked a technology that they were developing? Surely if they didn't want that technology to exist they wouldn't have...
I doubt that they will. I can understand $99 can seem like a lot to a student or a hobbiest - some iPhone developers are teenagers so that's a big ask. But for most serious developers it's pocket change, and since Apple makes a net loss from free apps, and there don't seem to be any shortage of them, I doubt that they're especially bothered if they miss out on a handful of indie apps because of the developer fee.Anyway, there's nothing to stop you learning the SDK and...
It's really not a good idea to talk with authority about subjects you aren't familiar with. There are enough iPhone developers on these forums (myself included) that you don't need to speculate about this stuff.The SDK and developer tools are free. The free tools will let you develop an app and test it on the simulator. To test your apps on a real iPhone or iPad, or release apps for the app store, the fee is $99 per year. You have to pay it even if you only release free apps.
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