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Posts by jlandd

 The other side of the same coin is a store being told what they can and cannot sell.  A new breed of chicken has begun to be processed.  You must carry it.  If you sell automobiles you must offer electric cars.  What it really is is the exact thing that people are railing against, which is being told what they, as private citizens/businesses must do. As far as a monopoly on apps on their devices, it's not much different than any corporation where you can't buy the product...
 You are correct about China.  There have been news reports as recently as yesterday, including Reuters, saying it is, hence my writing.  I apologize for passing along the inaccuracy.  See their language here: http://rbth.ru/business/2014/02/05/russia_becomes_the_second_country_to_ban_bitcoin_33871.html http://rt.com/business/bitcoin-russia-use-ban-942/ As far as Russia, the article quotes the Prosecutor General: "Russia’s official currency is the ruble. The introduction...
 It's currently legal in the U.S. but across the board illegal in Russia and China and all over the map everywhere else.  The tax aspect is very interesting.  Some countries have stated they recognize it as legit and will tax Bitcoin transactions, and some are going so far as to not recognize it as currency but will tax it anyway.  If that means the same as stocks, with "capital gains" for profits from transactions and mining considered "earned income" (or something like...
  Interesting story, involving someone not necessarily interested in dealing in hiding his own profits but clearly moved into that dubious area where others would have kept the door shut.  Even if it's not as completely anonymous as systems set up for encrypted, anonymous transactions, perception counts for plenty.  It's so well known for doing what it does that many probably assume it's the safest way to launder, that they can make it as anonymous as needed, even if...
   Yeah, I think it's pretty clear it's due to their pending own mobile payment system.  They also covered their bases for banning such not exactly objectionable apps by the rule that if an app's activity is illegal anywhere in the world they have the right to ban it, so they can choose when to ban or let apps slide according to their needs.  It's their store, they can do what they want.  Might be shutting themselves out of a slice of the pie, as Bitcoin has taken off...
    With all due respect, you're missing the point.  Of course sitting with the phone in her pocket caused it to short out.  But that's all the fire official's statement means.   But if you can't rule out that it the battery shorted out due to mere slight pressure in one particular location on the case and not from the force of the sitting then you can't conclude there was abuse.  And you need visible trauma to the case to go down the path that it was her force that caused...
   When I say "It's not an Apple issue, just a lithium-ion battery one" and "When phone battery fires are reported" it's pretty clear I'm not talking about iPhone stats or injury/death reports.  As far as citing reports of non-abuse/faulty accessory incidents, just search 'cell phone battery fire'.  You'll have a harder time finding reports of abused phone incidents than...
 No one's saying she didn't sit on it, of course she did.  Again, if all it takes to ignite it is the weight of a 13 year old girl then the back pocket is not the problem and saying just keep it out of your back pocket is not the answer.   The issue isn't about pockets and sitting.  Besides, you're assuming that she broke the phone by sitting on it, which the story does not say.  Just because she heard a pop when she sat doesn't mean she traumatized the battery with the...
   You're supporting my point, which was that if it truly did ignite merely by sitting with it in her back pocket, the "Oh, she sat on it, then there's nothing to see here, move along" response is far from what we *may* be looking at.  It doesn't matter if she kept it in safely away in her purse if a heavy object falls on it and this is what happens .03% of the time.   Sure, but it's not even about disposing of them properly, though I used the example of the danger of...
  I don't think it matters if she kept it in a dumb place or not.  That only matters if we're talking about a fire while we've got it on us.  A phone can easily get the same trauma when on a surface if a crushing event happens, and it doesn't seem to require a "perfect storm" of events (though obviously we're not hearing stories like this or hers regularly by any stretch, so I'm not saying it's likely).  Back pocket placement isn't the issue.  That a phone getting crushed...
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