or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by jlandd

  You're missing the point, as good audio isn't a factor in any company's value.  It's about making money with what they're buying.  Sennheiser is a good example of a (privately held) company that won't be bought by any publicly held company any time soon much less Apple.  No public company buys any audio company like Sennheiser, for a variety of reasons.  Same with Pandora and Spotify.  For all one can point to Beats' streaming and say "why would they have any interest in...
   I think you answered your own question  :  )  Naturally he acquisition has something to do with it, but it's not at all peculiar or bad style.  Very likely Bose has been keeping an eye on this for years and given it wait-and -see status depending on the arc of Beats as an entity.  Keep in mind that Iovine's made his millions by selling and buying companies (in fact he sold and bought back Interscope several times at startling profits each time) much moreso than he ever...
   Very true.  Phase reversal has been around since man has been able to make stereo recordings.  At it's most basic it's swapping a single wire.  There are a variety of approaches to noise canceling, simple phase reversal being the easiest and most commonly used.  Even in more complex approaches reversal of phase is often the final component, with the rest often used to enable what you desire to not cancel to be clearer and with less artifacts.      But patents are...
 That's with trademarks.  Patents don't fall into a use or lose scenario.  (Copyrights either).
 I doubt any of those have any forward thinking technology or assets worth owning to Apple.  Beats, for better or worse, did.
 It won't be any easier to collect from Apple than it would have beat from Beats before Apple.  The top shelf law firms of either would be arguing the same points to dismiss it.   Having deep pockets doesn't translate into easy settlements, especially if it will affect arguments in future headphone patent technology cases for them.
 That's the way it's always done.  There are times during a clear infraction when it's not time to sue yet.  For example, if someone steals a song and puts it out as one of theirs you never sue until it's a hit, or until its arc is over even if it's years later.  Otherwise you have no damages to claim, and they won't have money to pay.   Similarly if your value of the claim is in the millions and you know the company has no net worth (though we know in this case Beats had...
Extremely limited cases available for phone:  phone no sell   Cases finally readily available:  phone sells
  The irony that Beats' genre niche is the one with the least respect for trademarks and copyrights isn't lost.  Dr. Dre himself has been in lawsuits involving music lifted in beyond legal amounts from others' works and several have been ruled not in his favor.    It will be interesting to see if he is able to garner enough sympathy to support his newfound concern for the rights of the property owner.
  I'm no fan of Beats but it's no more a scam than the AC unit I had that the manufacturer had zero info about the spec that I wanted, or the external hard drive tech chart that doesn't even tell you the cache or speed of the drive inside.  If they don't want you to know it's usually all you need to know. In Beats' case legit freq response charts are out there, though for sure nowhere on their site, and they're not that hard to find. (Search images instead of web.)  Just...
New Posts  All Forums: