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Posts by zoetmb

I think it's a mixed bag. A community board did stop Apple from building a store near the Flatiron building because they didn't like Apple's architecture. On the other hand, there are tons of incredibly ugly storefronts and office buildings throughout New York City and many of those are also near the Flatiron building. So community boards and the like sometimes get involved and sometimes not and I don't know why. For example, did a community board actually...
The skyscrapers in New York are built to sway and are built on very strong bedrock. So my understanding is that New York could survive an earthquake quite well. The biggest danger probably is glass panes falling off of modern buildings and very old tenements that are only still standing because they're leaning on the adjacent building. There was an earthquake in New York City sometime around 1988. I woke up in the middle of the night and thought I saw my walls...
Actually it does. The R train goes across 59th street. There's a 5th Avenue station with several entrances: one on Central Park South (59th street) and one on the corner of 5th Avenue and 60th (I think). The Apple Store is on 5th Avenue between 58th and 59th street. The train tracks actually cut through the middle of the block between 59th and 60th street, but there's probably no way to connect the store to the station directly. They would have to dig a tunnel...
If you want a totally practical store, shop at Costco, BJs, Best Buy, Wal-Mart, etc. The flashy architecture makes the Apple stores destinations for both locals and tourists. Apple stores, especially the non-mall stores, generally have the highest grosses per square foot in retail, even luxury retail. The 5th Avenue store is open 24 hours a day. Do you really thing they would get the same attention and traffic if they were just "ordinary" stores? Do you think...
Guess you don't remember what this looked like before the glass cube. The retail was below grade and it was an uninviting, windswept area. In spite of its prime location, no retail there was ever successful. I think the cube is awesome and while it's very modern, it still works well across from the Plaza Hotel and Central Park. Having said that, it's not that the plaza couldn't be further improved, but I think that's the landlord's responsibility, not Apple's. ...
I don't know what you're talking about, iTouch myself all the time. Apparently, so does Michael Weiner. But on a more serious note: I applaud Apple for attempting to control the language that employees use in their contact with customers. I attempt to do the same thing in companies I consult for, especially in email communications, where a perceived strident tone can alienate clients. One trick I use in meetings is if someone (for example) makes an error in...
If he's able to be successful at JC Penney, it will have far more overall impact on physical retailing than the Apple stores have had, as successful as they've been. But I doubt he (or anyone) can accomplish that. One of the things that has made Apple stores successful is the exciting and small product line. JC Penney sells pretty much the same junk that any low-end department store sells. Apple can highlight products because they only have a few SKUs. JC Penney...
I agree. When I went to London, I bought an international data plan from AT&T for my time there. When I came back I canceled it and they essentially charged me by the day, so I just paid for the days I was there. I didn't bother with the international voice plan because I wasn't expecting to receive/make that many phone calls and the price differential on the calls wasn't that much (as I remember it.) (And by the way, my phone worked spectacularly in London - it even...
Uhhh...no. While Apple has certainly made amazing inroads and more and more business execs desire to use Pads, the fact remains that in most of large corporate America, there are Dells or Lenovo's sitting on most desks. And there are tons of proprietary and vertical market business applications that were developed in .NET and C# (or other languages and platforms) and in many cases, because of the use of plug-in development tools (such as Infragistics), don't even run...
That was his point. That he didn't make one and just having the idea for one doesn't give him any ownership claim. Perhaps you don't have neural capacity for understanding what he wrote.
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