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Posts by Sevenfeet

While the companies behind MCX really really hate swipe fees from Visa, MasterCard and Amex, Best Buy is seeing the writing on the wall for another problem that is a lot bigger for them:  fraud.  Best Buy stores are one of the biggest targets in the United States for buying merchandise with stolen credit cards.  Anything that will cut down the potential of fraud in their stores is something they need to pursue...this is a big issue with their senior leadership (CFO, CEO,...
Card verification security depends on the bank.  Some of my cards immediately authenticated for Apple Pay with no other need for verification.  But others like Bank of America required you to call them and go through a list of security questions that a thief probably wouldn't know.  i suspect that going forward, more banks will follow that model.  It's more labor intensive, but it will likely reduce fraud on the front end.
Just some perspective:     “This strong quarter caps an extraordinary year for Apple. Selling more than 39 million iPods and 5.3 million Macs while performing an incredibly complex architecture transition is something we are all very proud of,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “Looking forward, 2007 is likely to be one of the most exciting new product years in Apple’s history.” “We are pleased to have finished the year with over $10 billion in cash and to have increased...
I don't understand this.  Don't Samsung phones already have NFC for mobile payments baked into their designs?  Haven't those users already been able to piggyback onto the Apple Pay explosion of the last several weeks?   As for the technology in LoopPay, the biggest problem I can see is security.  You're basically using a fob to replicate a swipe at the terminal without having to do an actual swipe.  The biggest problem with this is that the old swipe technology is...
I'm not really disagreeing with you on your last sentence.  If the receiver of the information does nothing with it, then they will generally escape prosecution.  If they act on it or pass it on to someone else, then they are setting themselves up for prosecution. I may be conflating the regulations, but the spirit of what is trying to be enforced is consistent.  Don't reveal material information about the company in a manner that is not consistent with securities laws,...
Actually, you're wrong on this one.  First, I took my company's course on this only two weeks ago so my memory is fresh on all this.  But I also have some real world examples where people got into trouble.  The easiest example I can think of is my former company that got acquired into the company I work at now.  Back over a decade ago, our CFO got into trouble with the SEC for revealing what's known as "material information" about the company to a group of large investors...
I mean what I say.  At the Sr. VP level, Dave is a Director officer in the company.  If he reveals key sales data to myself, an outsider who works for another large silicon valley tech company, then he'd be in trouble for insider trading laws, regardless of whether I did anything with the information.  If I did anything with the information other than report it to authorities, then I'd be charged against those same laws.  My company makes all of us do training classes on...
 What I meant is that they were reviewed well.  I don't know sales numbers and I doubt Dave would tell me if I asked (major SEC violation).  The Fire didn't exactly set the world on fire (pun intended) when it was reviewed.  It was solid, but solid isn't enough in this market.
I've known Dave Limp for 30 years, since our college days.  We were hired at Apple together.  He's been an incredibly gifted and talented engineer and manager, and throughout his career and he's done very well for himself.  A number of Apple products in the 90's (PowerMacs) were his designs.   Of course, not every design is going to do well in the marketplace and I know he's disappointed about the Fire.  He was hired to do Amazon's first phone which had lower...
I'll add to that.  Thurgood Marshall was the chief lawyer for the NAACP back in the 1950s who among other things, argued Brown vs. Board of Education in front of the Supreme Court that we would later join.  He was also a close friend of my grandfather.  When he used to visit my grandparents in Opelika, AL during this period, he always traveled under an assumed name since he was afraid of getting lynched in Alabama.  Seriously.  This was the Alabama Tim Cook grew up in....
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