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Posts by Dlux

Regrettably, the mismatch between a US standard of living versus a Chinese standard of living keeps these kinds of jobs in China.Consider this: Why don't people set up machine shops in downtown Manhattan? After all, a worker in NYC should be able to survive on the same hourly wage as a worker in Cincinnati, or Shenzhen, yes? There's a reason why real-estate and demographics vary widely around the globe, and it's not Apple's job to correct any disparities.I think that was...
Arguably IBM in their heyday could have gone this route as well, but they obviously lost interest in the desktop/consumer market. They've done some pretty amazing things in their labs, but lack the design sense to use that knowledge in everyday products. While people are probably burnt out on hearing about Steve Jobs these days, he was indeed the central figure in tying these disparate disciplines together (as he said, Liberal Arts and Engineering) to a cohesive whole. It...
Perhaps, but not enough to be translucent. That's a pretty uncommon property for metal parts. But things keep developing...http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=23318
The ones I'm aware of (such as the Apple wireless keyboard) uses tiny laser-cut holes for the LED to shine through. In that case it's not because of thinness.
News to me!No need to do that. I've just never heard of castings used for this sort of application (especially with such thin walls as used for the top & bottom of a laptop.) Every non-Mac laptop I've ever seen has been plastic, but there again I don't come across many (most of my friends use Macs) or look at them closely at stores.
Ok, following up to my own post, I'm looking at my old TiBook. The lighter-colored band inside the 'sandwich' certainly looks cast, but as far as I can tell it appears to be painted plastic. Meanwhile, the hinges for the screen are almost certainly die-cast metal (probably zinc). The large panels themselves are presumably Titanium, which is a difficult material to work with, and probably too costly to continue which is why Apple no longer uses it. But the Ti holds up well...
Well, consider the quality expectations of the respective buyers...
Really? I wasn't aware that castings could hold up to impact, but I haven't had to deal with that sort of thing in a while.Inside, certainly. I'm wondering if we're talking about the same material and process. Everything I've seen as a casting has generally been somewhat brittle in an impact. Are you sure you're talking about cast metal? (As opposed to plastic or composite, which are actually molded in most cases.)
This is where competition is good. Most of the PC makers will flail and produce sub-standard designs, but one or two might 'think different' and come up with a better way to make enclosures. The problem for them, though, is they don't have the resources and production/purchasing scale of Apple (Thanks, Tim Cook!) nor necessarily the fortitude to invest in the long term, as has been pointed out elsewhere in this thread. Also, it will be more difficult for anyone to have a...
Casting generally doesn't yield the kinds of strength that a portable enclosure requires. Too prone to cracks.
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