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Posts by Mac-sochist

I can't believe the people who want to go back to the pocket watch...only this time without a fob, so you have to fish around in your pocket for it, pull it out, and turn it on to see what time it is.
The LCD itself will last essentially forever. Back in the early digital watch days they had a problem with water in the air like AMOLED, but by the early 80s that was handled.The lifetime involved is the backlight. In order to get even illumination, it's always bonded to the LCD any more. The diffuser is lit up by an "LED" light. I put that in quotes because it's really a blue LED imbedded in a blob of phosphor, so it's actually a fluorescent light. And phosphors wear out....
From Apple's website:(Emphasis mine) This is noncommittal, but it seems to imply it's more energy-efficient than a regular Apple LCD display. I hope to hell it's not AMOLED, but these mostly-black display pictures sure make it look that way.One thing—it is laminated to the crystal, so if it is LCD, when the backlight wears out, the whole thing needs to be replaced. What's the half-life on these things, 20,000 hours?
So we know the battery will only last a few years. That means it's replaceable—not at home of course, but at the Apple Store. (Or at any number of authorized jewelers for several times the price.) Knowing that, why do we think the guts of the watch couldn't be replaced just as easily? Sounds like it's a single module that would take the same two seconds to replace, once you've got it open, as the battery does. Bam! New Watch! IOW: Chill out! The case will be...
Yeah, at first glance it sounds like Lenin's Tomb. But unless he's embalmed in a glass coffin in there, I guess it is just a heartwarming tribute.
I don't. The only way to get banned from MacRumors is to point out some of the Fandroid lies. I had a few posts "edited" with a warning email, told Arn who laid the chunk, and never went back. So I guess I'm technically not banned....
Well, any galaxy that's outside our horizon is moving away from us faster than the speed of light. But that's from our point of view. From theirs, the reverse is true. If they'd had astronomers for a really long time, they could have seen our galaxy before it crossed their horizon, but now they can't see it at all.In the distant future, the universe will have expanded so far that only the Local Group would be inside our horizon, and astronomy will be a lot less...
Well, your "incoming" line of sight is about 13.8 billion light-years. When the light you're seeing right now was emitted, obviously it was much closer than that, but the universe kept expanding, and the oncoming photons took that long to catch up. If you tried to return a light-speed signal to the same point, it would take > forever.The 45 billion light years estimate is based on some rather iffy assumptions that General Relativity regards as illegitimate—trying to...
Cladist!!!
Oh, that's cute! Is this a new genre of Samsung spec-whoring that we can expect more of in the future?
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