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Posts by Mac-sochist

Because Android is an extremely inefficient Java Virtual Machine, and always runs on inefficient power-hungry processors that need huge-ass batteries and have to have big screens to cover them. Where have you been for the last four years? Even at that, "premium" phones are a small part of the market—Samsung sells most of their phones in the much smaller categories. They push the big phones because that's the only segment that makes them any money.
As TS said, the huge-screen phone market is a tiny fraction of the total. Even Samsung, the poster child for this category, sells most of their phones in the smaller sizes. They want to sell their large-screened "premium" phones preferentially, because that's where all the profit is. So who buys these phones? There may be a few platform-agnostic knowledgeable buyers who simply want a huge screen. I think this is a vanishingly small proportion. Most people who buy them...
If I could find my previous post on this subject, I'd just link to it: On every subject that I know something about, Consumer Reports has over the years revealed themselves as a bottomless well of ignorance. I actually gave up on them 37 years ago, when they rated the Dodge Omni and Plymouth Horizon "unacceptable" because if you're barreling down the road at 50 mph with your hands off the wheel, then reach out, jerk it 90 degrees, and then let go, they would "oscillate and...
Loss of words is sad, I agree, but loss of entire phonemes causes much more confusion. I've watched with dismay the last 40 years or so as features formerly confined to the New England dialect have spread all across the country.1) Loss of the "aw" sound in "dog". "Daughter" is now pronounced "dotter". (I was once embarrassed when I was told to hold something for "Don" Something-or-other, and I looked like an idiot when a woman named Dawn showed up for it.)2) Loss of the...
I would have to go with "toe" rag, too. "Tow" rag makes no more sense then "tow the line", and yet, you see people say that all the time.
Speaking of the 5C—I wonder how it would stack up in one of these ham-handed bend tests against plastic phones from...harumph!...other vendors? What with its molded-in steel reinforcement and all.No, I don't really want to see one destroyed—because to ask the question is to answer it.
As I've said before, I see people on the bus pull out one of these huge phones and hold it to their head, and everybody rolls their eyes and smirks at them behind their backs, including me. So I never thought I'd be tempted by a huge phone like these two. Since they came out, though, I've been considering how often I actually make calls, and all I can come up with is if I have car trouble (which I haven't for a few years, and honestly I'd have other things to worry about...
Well, we learn every day. No, I've never heard anything like "whinge" spoken, or used in (printed) writing—and probably half the books I read are British, too. Maybe it's a little old-fashioned even there? Just speculating. I don't mean to sound critical—I love dialectology.
Actually, turning "dive" into a weak verb is a British innovation—the American usage is, as in most cases, conservative. (I get kind of the same reaction seeing someone who's not a toothless hillbilly say "et" for "ate"—for an example going the opposite direction.)"Had ran" is just wrong. Presumably a typo. I'm surprised you've seen it actually used. The internet-only term that always slays me is "whinge" for "whine". Where does this come from? Does it rhyme with "hinge"?...
I feel the same way about all the new cars wasted in these idiotic crash tests. "Geez, you mean to say if you drive a car into a brick wall at 60 mph, it'll wreck it? That's useful information there!"("It hurts when I do this!" "Don't do that!"—Archie Campbell's wisdom covers so many areas.)
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