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Posts by timgriff84

Apple doesn't exactly do much other than iPhones and iPads. It represents over half of there business, so what do you expect?
How is it like taking on a partner, if you take on a partner you split the profit. Apple still takes 30% even if there is no profit. And how is it out the back door, you pay Apple to distribute your app and they also get 30% of what it sells for. After that its nothing to do with Apple. It would be like saying when I buy something from Amazon on my Mac, running Windows, using Google Chrome they've sold it to me through the back door as Apple, Microsoft and Google all...
Good for consumers, good for Apple, not so so great for the people putting in the work to produce apps. If you are an independent developer and you price your app at 79p you will pay 23.7p to Apple and 15.8p in tax leaving you with 39.5p. After that you also have to pay income tax (in the UK thats about 40%) so your then going to loose another 15.8p from what you had left leaving you with 23.7p. Apple has made exactly the same as you but they didn't do anything. Now some...
This seems quite outrageous. Selling content through a separate website that then gets downloaded into the app has absolutely nothing to do with Apple. Even if the app is free, developers still pay a yearly fee to have their app in the app store and it helps Apple sell more iOS devices. To then require apps to offer in-app purchases through Apples systems and let Apple take a 30% cut (before tax!) is a joke. What have Apple actually done to deserve that money? Plus it...
Obviously other tablets were going to take some market share away, but that's a huge amount more than I think anyone would seriously expect. Doesn't look good for this year when they start to get some actual serious competition.
My point is that they both have a lot of products that the other one doesn't have a competing product for, and in a lot of cases where they do there still not necessarily competing. Going back through that list.. - Maps. Yes Apple bought a mapping company, but they have yet to release a product and who knows what form it will come in. - Servers. Dropping the XServer means they've dropped out of the serious server business. Your not going to get anything serious running off...
But where don't they compete... Microsoft is in the following area that Apple is not: - Search - News (as in MSN) - ERP & CRM - Maps - Database Servers - Servers (now Apples dumping Xserver) - Email Servers - Web Languages - Whatever you class Silverlight as - Gaming platforms (as in DirectX) - Games Consoles - Surface - A whole load of other software products (Amalga, Forefront, Money etc) Then if you compare things they do that are the same there's still huge differences...
The kin may be unsold to consumers but you have no way of knowing if Microsoft was paid for the licenses or not. It would depend if there selling on a sale or return basis or not. Given that phones generally get packaged specific for a carrier I would guess that Microsoft has been paid for any phones at least delivered to carriers with no option for return.
This isn't actual phone sales, but the fact that the number has increased means that enough phones have been sold to require more licenses to be purchased. So on the whole it seems good. Not iPhone beating in the slightest but these things take years to gain momentum. Just look how many more iPhones got sold last year and it was already popular.
Very impressive results. However some things that struck me: 1. The iPhone has a higher average selling price than the iPad. Does it really cost more to produce or is the profit lower. 2. High sales of the iPods doesn't actually achieve much in revenue compared to the iPhone. 3. Almost 40% of the revenue comes from the iPhone. I would like to see how much profit each product actually brings in because if the iPhone has the highest profit margin then it's possible...
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