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Posts by derekmorr

This is really getting tedious.The data, such as it is, doesn't support the conclusions. Hence, the conclusions are garbage.As for density, can you provide screenshots showing density differences that support your claims?Since you can't be bothered to read Lyon's post, I'll summarize. He was responding to the "Android is for poor people" meme by saying it's just another way for Apple users to feel elite, privileged and superior to everyone else. It's classism, plain and...
I find that extremely hard to believe. If they did, they'd just use it as clickbait to wind up the faithful into raging against Google and "Lamesung"/"Scumsung"/"Samesung" in the comments.But, yes, I do care about bad stories, and I regularly call out pro-Google/Android stories on other social networks. Of course, all of this is getting pretty far off topic.
Here's a better question -- Would AppleInsider even have publishing this "story" if it did? It's really telling that AI constantly runs hit pieces trashing not just Android phones but Android users. I don't see that happen on non-Apple sites.I'm not sure why I'm bothering to respond to you, since your posts are just baseless personal attacks against entire categories of people who dare to use a different type of phone, but here goes. You're confusing the issue. Let's say...
You missed the point. Yes, there are questions about where this data came from. That's exactly why you shouldn't draw strong conclusions from it.But putting that aside, the maps don't support Dilger and Evans' claim that iOS is for the affluent and Android for the poor. The maps show that both platforms have very similar geographic distribution. So, yes, the claim "Twitter heat map shows iPhone use by the affluent, Android by the poor" is garbage.Again, that's not the...
This is one of the worst researched articles I've seen on here, which is saying something. It's conclusions would be laughed out of an undergraduate-level research methods class. A few basic questions come to mind: Where did this dataset come from? Who collected it? When was it collected? How was it collected? Without knowing answers to these questions, it's hard to take the conclusions seriously. We know, for example, the iOS 6 has built-in Twitter support. Might that...
There are several things wrong with that statement.   Android does have virtual memory. It does not have swap. The two are not the same. Virtual memory means that each process has an independent, isolated memory space. Android implements this. It's part of its security and fault-tolerance models.   Android only kills apps when it's low on memory. By the say, regular desktop Linux does the same thing (using a different strategy), even on systems with swap space. It's...
No, it isn't. People still do botch User Agent sniffing. I see it all the time.Two quick examples:Akamai IO mis-classified Chrome for iOS and Android as Chrome desktop, and Firefox for Android as Firefox desktop, for over 9 months. How do I know this? Because I emailed them and they told me. They've finally fixed their error.The WPTouch plugin for WordPress still doesn't properly distinguish between Android phones and tablets, so I often get the phone version of a website...
Rarely. When I do, I can usually copy and paste them. Or use DNS. Also, not all IPv6 addresses are long. For example, here's one: 2610:8:6800:1::35. In IPv6, if you have a large range of continuous zeros you can write them as a double colon ( :: ). So you could write that address as 2610:0008:6800:0001:0000:0000:0000:0035, but who wants to type all of that?There have been some problem with v6 RBLs for spam, but there are better options for spam control than that. Honestly,...
Wrong. Skype uses it for video calls. Support was first added in 2010.
I have to disagree with much of that. I've been an IPv6 deployment lead at my employer for several years, and, frankly, it's not that hard to work with. NAT is not a security technology. It was never designed to be. IPv6 doesn't change that. The use of EUI-64 addresses isn't really a privacy concern, and the so-called privacy addresses don't actually increase privacy and make network management significantly more complicated. The idea with "privacy" addresses is to...
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