or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by derekmorr

The Atlantic just ran a story about how Street View is used to update Google Maps. In short, Google uses computer vision to identify street signs, speed limits, businesses, etc, and updates their maps. They use the GPS data from their cars to update road alignments. Their human editors use the data to verify updates. So even if you don't use Street View, you're probably using its side-effects.
Streetview is also useful to virtually explore the world, such as the Kennedy Space Center or shelters used by Antarctic explorers. The other day I was poking around inside the White House with Street View.   Frankly, I think Google has the best free mapping apps available. Maps has Street View, 45-degree oblique imagery (similar to Bing's Birds-Eye view), Streetview, internal building maps, walking, biking, and transit directions. Earth has 3D. There's no need to...
And the problem with thermonuclear war (and software patents) is that no one wins.
  Folks should also watch this: The Patent Pollution Problem, a talk by Dan Ravisher, Executive Director of the Public Patent Foundation. It's a great talk about why we have so many lousy, ridiculous patents. Folks should also read Bessen & Meurer's analysis of software patents in Patent Failure. Their chapter on software patents is freely available: http://researchoninnovation.org/dopatentswork/dopat9.pdf.     I really am amazed that so many commenters on here defend...
Huh? The Galaxy Pro is clearly not a feature phone. If you're going to call that a feature phone, then you'd have to call a BlackBerry a feature phone. That's not whining, it's just the truth.The Pantech Swift doesn't even run Android. It runs Brew. So I really have no idea what point you're trying to make here.This entire thead has been a waste of time. You don't have an argument. You hate Google, and you're just trying to smear their reputation with increasingly...
Uh, no. Just because an applicant has filed for a patent doesn't mean that the application is valid. The Patent Office denies patent applications all the time. Even for patents that are granted, many are subsequently invalidated or restricted in scope.Further, have you read the patent in question? It doesn't describe anything that's actually patentable. It's just a 10,000-foot level mess of hand-waving legalese. I'm simply dumbfounded that otherwise intelligent people are...
I'll ask you one more time -- can you name a single feature phone running Android?Further, assuming that these mythical Android-powered feature phones aren't accessing the Play Store, then why do developers care what version of the OS they run? The brunt of the discussion has been about "fragmentation" and the alleged inability of developers to use new OS features in their apps. If these mythical Android feature phone users aren't installing apps, they they're not relevant...
That's a very disingenuous way to phrase it. You make it sound like Google stole an implementation from Apple. Nothing of the sort happened. Apple's universal search patent (http://www.google.com/patents/US8086604) is overly broad and shouldn't have been issued. Read the patent if you haven't already. It's essentially a vague, 10,000-foot level description of searching multiple repositories and sorting the results. It's full of empty phrases like "each heuristic module...
I didn't claim that you could. But there have been several claims in this thread that developers can't use newer APIs on older devices, and that's just not the case. Speaking of compiler improvements, apps packaged for older devices can take advantage of improvements in the Android build tools. Each new rev of the SDK includes more lint checks, which apply to all versions of the OS, and the NDK includes performance improvements, bug fixes, and security improvements...
I did, repeatedly, in a thread about a month ago. To repeat myself: When a device access the Play Store, it sends a unique ID and its Android version. These are stored by Google. If that device is later reactivated, it's not counted twice. If it's upgraded to a newer version of the OS, only the latest version is counted. The count isn't based on how many times a user access the Store, or if they install an app. It's only based on if they access it all, even once.Obviously,...
New Posts  All Forums: