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Posts by shard

Let's not forget that Android developers have to develop for the lowest denominator if they want the whole Android market. Meaning not taking advantage of new Android features or hardware features and only coding to suit the oldest Android handsets out there.
Releasing the iPhone 5 later will give them more time to sell the white iPhone 4. Furthermore, the current iPhone design works, why reinvent the wheels? I personally think the following will be introduced with the iPhone 5: 1. Faster CPU/GPU 2. Better camera 3. Gsm and Verizon in one device 4. 64GB version 5. New version of iOS with new functionality
Any decent developer will test against at least all current models. Meaning the MacBook, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac Pro, iMac and Mac Mini. That is only 6. If you are really careful, you test 9, including the 2 Airs and 3 MBPs. Double that for 2 OS versions. That is a very small number compared to Android.
My complaint has never been about having to code for different devices, it is the testing that is a problem. The sheer number of devices to test makes it a huge task.Think about it another way, if I create a website I test it against the major browser engines on the market to make sure it displays correctly. IE, Safari, Chrome, Firefox and Opera. Now imagine if all of a sudden instead of just 5, there are 100 different browser engines. My development time stays the same...
If I assume that my app will work on all Android devices without testing, I am a bad developer. Assumption is the mother of all f***ups. Even on iOS, even though iOS supports multiple languages natively, some messaging apps have problems with non alphanumeric languages, the selection of Chinese characters don't show up because the text box is too short. All these can be prevented with proper testing. My point remains the same, I can code, test against the reference handset...
You just made my point. Ideally an app written for 1 Android should work on all other Android devices. There should not be a need to have different versions or decide to write off entire segments of the market.The fact that developers are doing this means that there is fragmentation. Yes, even the difference in performance between an iPad and iPad 2 is considered fragmentation, right now we have apps that include high resolution graphics for the iPad 2, Infinity Blade and...
It's different because the nature of the networks is different. GSM supports concurrent data, voice and messaging and Verizon does not. The way the apps switch etc is handled differently. Ideally it should be write once deploy to many. But when fragmentation occurs you are writing once to deploy to one.
You are over simplifying. There are different ARM CPUs in use with different amounts of ram and different graphics capabilities. We actually do test against everything, no shortcuts. Just because somethings share the same components does not mean they are the same, unless they have the exact same specs. You may think it's easy but it is not. A Motorola Droid running one version of Android and another with a different version is considered 2 devices. The GSM version of the...
Any body can be a developer for Android, there are no fees involved, but how many have really written an app? Apple requires developers to pay and register. It weeds out the posers Just look at the number of apps for iOS and that for Android and you will have an idea.
Another sore point. Most Android devices to date are not upgradable to the latest version of Android, they are stuck at the release version or at most one or two versions up. This is not the fault of Google and the Android team but rather the phone manufacturers abandoning their users in as little as 6 months to focus on newer devices and forcing users to upgrade. This is one of the main causes of Android's fragmentation. iOS on the other hand supports devices up to 2 to 3...
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