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Posts by KDarling

  Yep.  When analytics firm Visible Measures released its list of the ten most viral tech ads of 2012, Samsung's GS3 "The Next Big Thing" commercial ranked at the top of the list (71 million views)   Altogether, Samsung got four of the top ten, and Apple only got one ad (iPhone 5 intro - 18 million views) on the list.   All top ten can be seen here on the Visible Measures website.   Other major firms such as Ad Age also ranked Samsung's ads in the top ten viral for...
  Yes.  Koh ordered a new trial to determine the disputed amount from the poorly done jury reward sheet.  It's supposed to start this November.   This is not to be confused with the other IP trial due to start in Spring 2014.  (That's the one where she has limited the number of claim construction issues, so the trial can at least get started this decade.)
  True, Samsung decided to boost their ad budget and it really seemed to help.     Apple does use celebrities.  Remember the Siri ads?  (Scorsese, Deschanel, Jackson)   Besides those, some of their other ads were also not that great.  E.g. the short-lived "Genius" series.   Overall, Samsung got some good bang for their advertising bucks.  They had most of the top viral ads last year, especially the ones playing off people waiting in line.   Their biggest ad goof (IMO) was...
  Nope.  Worldwide, Apple spent $1 billion last year.  Apple's ad budget for the whole world hasn't been around $300 million in a long while:     I was quoting Electronista, who was quoting Kantar about just USA phone ad budgets.   BGR had a similar article:   "Samsung spent $402 million in 2012 marketing its smartphones in the United States, topping even Apple (AAPL) with its similarly enormous $333 million U.S. marketing budget for the iPhone."
  Yep, there's a lot of ITC decisions being appealed by all sides.     I got curious and looked up the most recent stats of ITC decisions overturned by the CAFC:   2008 -  7% 2009 -  0% 2010 - 15% 2011 - 27% 2012 - 15%   Additionally, it's apparently rare for major ITC computer patent decisions to get changed.
  OTOH, the city of Mountain View got all the same benefits from Google locating there, plus free downtown WiFi.  (Google is doing the same thing around their Chelsea HQ in Manhattan).   Remember the Cupertino Mayor half begging Steve Jobs for similar free WiFi, at the spaceship town meeting?   You'd think that Apple could afford that for their home town.  Especially since they're building cafeterias to keep their employees from going out during lunch and spending time...
  GSM phones use a second radio .. a CDMA one... for 3G.  You might know it as UMTS-3G / WCDMA.     No surprise here.  I've been repeating in my posts for months that the ITC's sole power is injunctions, and they want to keep that power.   However, this ban doesn't have a big impact, so it's also politically safe.   The last major time the ITC did this with phones was in 2007 when they banned CDMA devices using a Broadcom patent from coming in... and Verizon almost ran...
Everyone's boosting their ad budgets.   For example, in the US, Samsung went from being way behind Apple on ad spending all these years, to spending $401 million on phone ads in 2012.  (A lot was on the GS3 ads.)   Apple wasn't just sitting around, though.  They boosted their own 2012 spending to $333 million.   It's a great time to be either a patent lawyer or in advertising :)  
  Actually, if you think about it, nine days is a pretty slow return for a $400 investment at a hospital, a place where they charge patients $10 for each styrofoam cup and ice bucket.    Nine days is only a savings of $1.85 an hour.  Barely a blip on overall hourly user cost.  Wonder if they're factoring in hiring someone to maintain hospital apps, too.  Or are they just using it as a web tablet?    Still, saving a little here, saving a little there, never hurts.     Next...
I'd think that their technique would be more likely to be used by government agencies / law enforcement, than by "malicious chargers" bought off the internet.   Although I could also visualize someone setting up a fake iPhone charging station at a mall and putting a password trojan in every phone that was used on it.   (Remember when those guys put a fake non-working ATM in a mall, just to collect ATM card numbers and passwords?)
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