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Posts by KDarling

  2. Don't know, but could.  Phones using it are due second half of 2013.   1. Would help space-wise, but it depends on if Apple adds another antenna.   To use both LTE and CDMA (SVLTE) at the same time, or to transmit on two CDMA lines (SVDO), it requires two transmit antennas. Phones such as the Galaxy have two transmit antennas, and thus are able to do SVDO and/or SVLTE. The iPhone 5 apparently only has one transmit antenna.  This means it cannot do SVDO or...
  I have both.  In real life, they don't look very much alike.  The Samsung one has a nice flange to grab hold of.  The Apple one has that grey inner area.  There's no way to mistake one for the other.     Apple doesn't provide a charger with the iPod touch, for instance.  Just a USB cable.   And golly, I sure wish Apple used a mini-USB like the rest of the planet, so you could use anybody's charger while you're out and around.    Or maybe be really cool and come up with...
  On the contrary, not only did Apple cross-license some of their patents to Nokia...    Apple also offered to license their patents to Samsung for a (rather large) fee before all the big trials began.   Moreover, last year HTC and Apple entered into a ten year agreement cross-licensing "all current and future patents" (minus a few HTC utility, and all Apple design patents).   -   The HTC contract is especially interesting, as it lets us know some of Apple's terms, which...
  Try clearing your cache.  I saw the editor stuck sometimes on HTML for the past few days until I did so.  I think something changed.
  It's demonstrably difficult to predict the long term future of phone makers, though.   Eight years ago, who could have predicted the sharp fall of Nokia, Blackberry and WinMo?  Or that HTC, who used to be the ODM for many of the world's phones, would go out on their own, to rise and then stumble. -   One solid fact that we have learned from smartphone history, is that once any player gets too held back by legacy support (hardware and/or software and/or UI), then they...
  Cross-licensing has been such a common ETSI practice for decades, that apparently few if any major SEP holders actually ever had a cash price available.  Reference: that IPR paper above, and the ITC evidence documents.     Heck, back at the beginning of cellular, Motorola (the primary inventor) used to only have two deals available:  either you bought your chips/radios from them with the IP included, or you cross-licensed every patent you had.  There was no...
  Right, Apple pays Qualcomm for the chipset, and then also a royalty that is calculated by the wholesale price.  However, supposedly Apple made a deal with Qualcomm where the wholesale price used for the calculation, is what Apple pays Foxconn (~$240), not what retailers pay Apple.   As for the previous question about basing royalties on the whole device, here are some more references to that practice (and to cross-licensing):      
  Actually, usually they do simply register a patent with the SSO as essential, with little or no review.   These things are taken on good faith, and only challenged if a lawsuit arises.   In fact, the evidence in the ITC case, submitted by various patent holders, noted that nobody could ever remember an engineer at a technical meeting actually saying, "Okay, this one will be essential."  Frankly, it was too much bother.  Such things were done later on.   Moreover, as the...
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