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Posts by KDarling

  What an odd question.  What Apple knows doesn't matter, since they're not going to tell us :)  Everything discussed here is obviously for our own entertainment and benefit.     First, I presume you meant smartphones.  Second, did you mean 3.5 "or 4.0" iPhone screen?  (Half of iPhone sales are each size.)   Size sales ratio is a topic that no one has satisfactorily answered yet.   However, I'm not sure that a claim, that more are sold that are smaller than a 3.5" iPhone,...
  That is closer to what the article should've been talking about:   What are the most popular screen sizes in the price range that Apple would want to fit in, especially to gain sales outside of the US, where Android dominates?   I.e. Apple probably doesn't want to sell in the very low price ranges.  Most people think they'd be after the $300-$400 market.  So what screen size dominates there?   That's what should be researched. 
  The chart clearly says that "figures are not exact".     Furthermore, this topic has been explained here before, and you even said:   Even then, I pointed out THE ACTUAL VALUES BEING USED for devices that are hitting the Market, not what someone guessed at to fit their agenda.     Now you're just being silly.  Nobody said they were set totally arbitrarily.  I said they got to set what their default was.  Obviously they do so within reason, with the eye towards most apps...
  The article is based on several misunderstandings.   Normal goes more like 3.5" to 4.8". The charts are tricky to read, and more importantly, each manufacturer sets what category their device displays by default.When programming for Android, here are the categories that developers actually use:   Galaxy Mini (3.1") - small, ldpi Galaxy Ace (3.5") - normal, mdpi   Galaxy S (4.0") - normal, hdpi Galaxy S2 (4.3") - normal, hdpi Galaxy S3 (4.8") - normal,...
  More like Apple sees it as a niche market that they're not interested in.   It has nothing to do with playing hardball. The government's not begging Apple to sell to them.  After all, the feds already have other devices to choose from.   It's the poor government employees who want to use Apple products that will suffer, not the government itself.
  Google's gathering hotspot location info with their Street View cars was fine.   Heck, anyone can collect hotspot MAC addresses.  Many groups have done it.  Early public domain hotspot positioning projects gathered donated info.   Skyhook used that info, plus drove around to get their own hotspot database that the iPhone used at first in place of GPS.      In fact, iOS devices gather hotspot info every time they ask for a location, or you turn on your phone, or you make...
  Google stopped giving Sync away to new customers for free earlier this year.   FAQ:  http://support.google.com/a/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2716936   Article: http://www.macworld.com/article/2022321/what-the-end-of-google-sync-means-to-you.html   Probably Google had to pay more for their license of MS ActiveSync.     (Some might remember that Google wrote Congress last year, suggesting that de facto standards should have the same rate protection as FRAND patents.  ...
  Who said they're not sending up info?   I would think that of course they're sending up your location, in order to generate specific cards because of your calendar, location, traffic, pending packages, etc.   Anticipating your needs, based partly on your location, is the whole point of the app.     D'oh!     I was guessing that if cell was not available, the significant change API switched to WiFi ... but as I said, that was just a guess.  Rereading the docs,...
  The story is obvious.   Cities don't want to spend extra money dealing with thefts (even marginally) that they think can be prevented by phone makers implementing various technology.   Many people will remember that insurance companies and car owners pushed for steering wheel locks and coded keys for similar reasons.     That's what they want to spend time on.  Not dealing with crime rate increases caused by electronic thefts.
  The OS doesn't matter. Even with iOS, an update must be approved by DISA.     The DoD already authorizes and buys specific models for secure comms.  That won't change.   As long as the Knox OS itself is secure, other updates are not subject to fragmentation. Remember, even the default browsers, email and other apps are updated separately with Android.
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