or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by KDarling

  Sure, I've had to implement map applications using APIs from Google and Bing in less time than that ... by myself... as have many others in this world.   So it's quite believable that two guys working hard could do it, especially with Google expertise available to personally explain the APIs and/or tweak them to requests.   Plus the developers only needed to come up with a working version good enough for a fairly quick demo.  Then they had almost six more months before...
  From the last world comparison I saw, right when the iPhone 5 came out (if anyone has later, please post)...   The US looked like this:   The UK and Australia looked like this:   Most of the EU looked like this:   And here was China:  
  Google phone maps started back in 2005 with Google Local for Mobile for any Java enabled handset. It had road and satellite images, GPS support, directions, local search and results dialing. Traffic was later added in 2006 when the name was changed to Google Maps for Mobile.     As for the iPhone, Apple added maps relatively late in its development before showing it off.    
  Oh for sure, but at least Eclipse runs on lots of machines.  (I think there'd be a ton more iOS apps if we could use XCode on PCs.)   I've been using Eclipse for Blackberry, Android and web app development at work for many years, so I'm used to it.    Also, I agree about the simulator.  I use actual devices, which I got for cheap off eBay with bad ESNs (which I don't care about, since I use local WiFi for testing.)   By less hassle, I meant it's easier to create an app,...
  Wait. What?  There's still 3G only devices.  Are you thinking of AT&T instead?     You and TS are missing the point in your zealousness to find fault with me or to defend Apple.  Drop the chip from your shoulder and you might find some useful info here.   The article makes it sound as if the iPhone 5 only makes up half of iPhone sales (2 million of 4 million activations).    In reality, there were less sales than activations, which means that the iPhone 5 sales were...
Keep in mind when doing calculations, that activations include previously owned phones being passed down or sold.   For AT&T, the used portion of activations has been anywhere from 10 - 20% in the past.  Haven't checked for Verizon.   This is important to remember when later trying to correlate quarterly sales figures with activations, or when trying to figure out iPhone demand.
  For most types of apps, fragmentation is no more a worry than it's ever been on mobile devices.  There's really only a few basic Android screen categories to worry about, much like there's only a handful of different iOS screens.   For students and hobbyists, Android is less hassle and less costly, as you can first send your app to friends to try out without getting involved in a store at all, and then it only costs a one-time $25 fee to publish.   Apple charges $100...
  Rather, the other way around.  At the end of October 2006, Apple asked for Google's help with a mobile API to access Search and Maps.  (Imagine the iPhone's first year without Search, Maps, YouTube, and cell tower location.  It would've been a much less interesting and useful device without Google's products being ported.)   There's no evidence that Google engineers got to see the iPhone or its UI at all.  The stories say they hid all that. Heck, Apple didn't even show...
  Taking their money from Apple?  Apple doesn't pay the developers for apps out of their own pocket.   The people buying the apps pay for them.   On the other hand, Microsoft has been known to pay for apps to be done for their store.
New Posts  All Forums: