or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by KDarling

  Each to their own.   Glass and aluminum are not what most people would call "premium" materials.   Now, if someone used Gorilla glass for the back as well, and Liquidmetal for the surround, I think that would likely be considered as using premium options.
  That's supposed to be "causal nexus", not "causal next".   In other words, the idea that a patented feature needs to be a reason why people choose one device over another, before it can be considered as a valid injunction reason.     Nothing to do with Samsung.   Nokia just wants the right to ask for injunctions themselves, in the future, if even the smallest of their patents is infringed by anyone.   For example, let's say Nokia had a patent on showing signal strength...
  I can't believe anyone is arguing over plastic, glass and aluminum.   What's the difference in cost?  A few dollars at most?   None of them are what is usually considered to be a "premium" material... they're more in the mass "recyclable" category.   Try giving your girlfriend an aluminum ring, while telling her that at least it's better than a plastic one.
  To be exact:   Apple originally paid for perpetual exclusive consumer electronics rights to any technology created or acquired by Liquidmetal Technologies through February 2012.   In mid 2012, Apple paid to extend that perpetual license to include any LM enhancements through February 2014.   In other words, the license has always been perpetual.  What the perpetual license covered, is what was extended.   Anyone know who the LM competitors are?  I wonder if Samsung has...
  Featurephones could usually only download from the carrier's store.  E.g. a Verizon flip phone could only download from its built-in Verizon store menu.  What was that called?  Oh yeah, VCast.   That seems like it would set a precedent for Apple's store.   Smartphones (Blackberry, Windows Mobile) could download apps from anywhere.  They were not restricted to just using the carrier's store.   Some even came with a Handango store client, IIRC. (I had a Handango account...
  Wrist guard?   Wrist band?     Ah, I know.  How about something warrior-like:  the  "Amulet of Power!"
  Of course it is.    Users are only allowed to download apps from a certain store. The store is accessible and paid for from the phone. The user does not have to enter account data each time.   You pay to be a developer.   Your app is vetted before being allowed in. You get a percentage.   That's exactly the model used by the feature phone carrier app stores that long predated Apple's store.     Didn't you ever download an app or ringtone with an old flip phone?
  So is Blackberry.  And Airbus.   Back during the Cold War, the US bent over backwards to give lucrative contracts to homeland manufacturers such as TI, fearing any dependency on outside sources.  The last thing we wanted, was to lose access to critical chips if a war denied us access to factories overseas.   Nowadays, everything's about saving money.  Using off-the-shelf equipment, instead of custom gear, is a major push.  That's why we see iPads and iPods being used,...
  It sounds like Samsung needs help keeping up with the demand for smaller LCDs for mobile devices, and is:   Shifting responsibilty for larger panels to Sharp Planning for longterm help from Sharp for smaller mobile panels
The ironic thing is that before the Apple App Store, Jobs used to poke fun at carriers and their app "walled gardens"... and yet all he did was turn around and create his own, even higher walled garden.   (It's higher, because carriers allowed smartphones to download apps and media from any store, not just theirs.)     It used to be that the app seller did that for you in return for their percentage.  When I started selling software in the 1980s, distributors paid for...
New Posts  All Forums: