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Posts by Woochifer

Yep. That and Google's spotty customer service history in general. They already pushed Google Checkout, and it was a market failure. I had to use Google Checkout to purchase tickets to an event a few years ago. Clusterf*** all the way around. Convoluted registration process. Multiple failed attempts to process the transaction. And in the end, Google Checkout failed with the event organizer as well. They wound up having to cancel all of the Google transactions, and have...
Even if their cloud security protects personal info as well as they claim, the knock against MCX is that they collect and share that data to begin with. MCX comes across as anti-consumer because it inconveniences customers with QR codes and PIN numbers and requires direct access to their bank accounts. And for what? So that retailers can mine more information about their customers?   The privacy protections built into Apple Pay are a direct threat to the retailers' data...
My collection is just over 10,000 tracks. However, I also use high bitrate conversions and uncompressed tracks, so storing my entire collection without any downsampling would require 140 GB. I use iTunes Match, but whenever I travel, I have to pick out the playlists and move them locally onto my phone before heading out.
A strong seller yes, but probably not enough to sustain the 1.8" hard drive production line by itself. In earlier years, the majority of the iPod lineup used 1.8" HDs, and those components were used on multiple devices from multiple OEMs, and available from multiple suppliers. Eventually it dwindled down to Toshiba selling a 3+ year old design to just one customer. The economies of scale just aren't there anymore for the iPod line.
This doesn't surprise me. Even though the article did not specifically call out which component had the most sourcing difficulties, for years Apple has been the last remaining OEM customer for the 1.8" hard drive format, and Toshiba was the last manufacturer. The 1.8" hard drive had seen no improvements or new R&D for at least three years, and with sales on the decline I'm actually surprised that the iPod classic lasted as long as it did. We've had rumors of its pending...
 The problem is that AMC currently charges a carriage fee to EVERY basic cable subscriber. Selling a season pass through iTunes is a far more limited market with comparatively low revenue upside. The whole rationale for non-premium cable channels such as FX and AMC going to original prestige programming is to make the channels so essential to a large cross-section of viewers that the cable/satellite providers must re-up for those channels, even if the carriage fee goes way...
 I think a lot of this is overreliance on the OTA updates. In order to do the OTA update, the device needs to create a full backup of the current OS and a full image of the new OS after unpacking and uncompressing the installation file. These are fail safes that at least give you a chance to restart and roll back your device if something goes wrong during the installation. That's why it requires ~6 GB of free space to update to iOS 8 using OTA installation. If you...
My experience with a 5s was the exact opposite. From iOS 7.0 through 7.0.3, the phone would randomly restart every few days and a large number of my apps would crash regularly. Safari was particularly problematic. 7.0.4 was the first version of iOS 7 that did not crash or restart all the time, and it came out in mid-November. Ever since updating to iOS 8 on the first day it came out, I have not had a single restart and the app crashes have been limited to a handful of apps...
 Yep, Apple plays the long game. Perfect example is how they executed the 64-bit iOS transition. They didn't just introduce a 64-bit SoC to fill out a spec sheet, they had a 64-bit OS ready to go at launch, and went 64-bit with all of the preinstalled apps as well. Now, they've positioned the product line to go all 64-bit by next year, which gives developers a very large target market for 64-bit apps. All the while, Apple's SoCs perform at a high level while remaining very...
That's for "marketing" not just advertising, and it includes the entire company, not just their mobile division. That said, a huge chunk of Samsung's marketing budget IIRC goes to spiffs at the retail level -- basically, bonuses in cash and products given to retailers and sales reps that meet certain sales goals and allocate prime spots to display Samsung products. This individual and collective financial incentive is why retail sales reps push Samsung so hard. Apple...
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