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Posts by Woochifer

Reboots/resprings were very common with the early versions of iOS 7. Look up "white screen of death" and you'll find plenty of references. With my 5s at least, this issue had largely gone away by the time 7.0.4 rolled out. Not sure if it was because Apple fixed iOS or because developers updated their apps for iOS 7 or a combination. And since iOS 8 came out, I have had exactly zero reboots/resprings and the app crashes are largely limited to a group of games that had...
Yeah, when you go over your data cap, Verizon charges overage fees to the tune of $10 for every 1 GB over (rounded up to the next whole number). I don't know about Sprint, but T-Mobile's top tier unlimited plan ($80 a month) is really unlimited with no throttling.
Don't know if things have improved in the interim; but, before the merger with T-Mobile, Metro PCS actually had more customers in the SF Bay Area than Sprint because the network was so bad. And Sprint's insistence on keeping their phones locked in perpetuity pretty much eliminated them from consideration when I was shopping for a carrier last year. Just in the last year since I went on T-Mobile, they have exempted music streaming from data caps and added free tethering....
Of course "it's been shown" because T-Mobile tells you right up front how much 4G/LTE data you get every month before throttling kicks in. You're making it sound like they somehow hide the data caps from their customers. Technically, I have an unlimited plan, but T-Mobile always described it as a "5 GB 4G" plan. And unlike these grandfathered "unlimited" plans, T-Mobile offers an actual unlimited plan with no throttling. And your point about "worst LTE coverage" -- what...
Yep. That and Google's spotty customer service history in general. They already pushed Google Checkout, and it was a market failure. I had to use Google Checkout to purchase tickets to an event a few years ago. Clusterf*** all the way around. Convoluted registration process. Multiple failed attempts to process the transaction. And in the end, Google Checkout failed with the event organizer as well. They wound up having to cancel all of the Google transactions, and have...
Even if their cloud security protects personal info as well as they claim, the knock against MCX is that they collect and share that data to begin with. MCX comes across as anti-consumer because it inconveniences customers with QR codes and PIN numbers and requires direct access to their bank accounts. And for what? So that retailers can mine more information about their customers?   The privacy protections built into Apple Pay are a direct threat to the retailers' data...
My collection is just over 10,000 tracks. However, I also use high bitrate conversions and uncompressed tracks, so storing my entire collection without any downsampling would require 140 GB. I use iTunes Match, but whenever I travel, I have to pick out the playlists and move them locally onto my phone before heading out.
A strong seller yes, but probably not enough to sustain the 1.8" hard drive production line by itself. In earlier years, the majority of the iPod lineup used 1.8" HDs, and those components were used on multiple devices from multiple OEMs, and available from multiple suppliers. Eventually it dwindled down to Toshiba selling a 3+ year old design to just one customer. The economies of scale just aren't there anymore for the iPod line.
This doesn't surprise me. Even though the article did not specifically call out which component had the most sourcing difficulties, for years Apple has been the last remaining OEM customer for the 1.8" hard drive format, and Toshiba was the last manufacturer. The 1.8" hard drive had seen no improvements or new R&D for at least three years, and with sales on the decline I'm actually surprised that the iPod classic lasted as long as it did. We've had rumors of its pending...
 The problem is that AMC currently charges a carriage fee to EVERY basic cable subscriber. Selling a season pass through iTunes is a far more limited market with comparatively low revenue upside. The whole rationale for non-premium cable channels such as FX and AMC going to original prestige programming is to make the channels so essential to a large cross-section of viewers that the cable/satellite providers must re-up for those channels, even if the carriage fee goes way...
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