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Posts by Macky the Macky

"...and it doesn't have a keyboard. That makes it not a good phone for business," — Steven Ballmer
Thanks for the correction. I remember bits of that period of time and how the road looking forward for the RISC chips looked grim as Intel specs were on a meteoric climb. No one had switched, like Apple did, and survived it didn't look god for Apple at the time. I got my timeline a bit blurred.
I don't know if a radio chip circuitry can co-exist on a SoC with other digital circuitry without a lot f cross-talk. but if that were possible, then Apple should buy the rights to do that from Qualcom and get on with it... No need to pay the foundry costs for two chips and eat up more space in the iDevice. This leverages Apple's ability to customize while not carrying the load of staying competitive in the radio market.
Good morning, boys and girls. Today's word is "incinerate." Can you say, "incinerate"? I knew that you could...
I didn't quote the rest of constipated thinking since is was BS from start to end. All of the AI stories you referenced were good articles that provoked a lot of interest shown by the volume of comments generated. Intel is lagging the field lately. Apple, for one, has been left waiting to release new products due to Intel's inability to lead the market in several areas.In addition Apple is cranking up the speed of innovation putting pressure on all of its chip...
Apple's entry into designing their own chips wasn't a supply chain problem but was a desire to control their own speed of HW advancement. (probably learned from the problem they had with RISC CPUs a few years earlier) If you look at Apple's strategic acquisitions over the last half-decade, they mostly give Apple more freedom of their product design advances. The more custom Apple is, the more they can offer their customers while making it harder and harder for their...
Intel, like Microsoft, didn't anticipate the mobile computer/device/phone wave coming. Jobs even tried to clue Intel into fabbing the ARM chips for Apple. But the profits per ARM chip was a fraction of what Intel was getting for each x86 chip they sold. So when the wave hit, Intel and Microsoft were caught flat-footed and the scramble took until now to have a viable product to offer. Intel's now-shipping power-sipping x86 chip needs to be marketing at far less then the old...
All these things (and even more) you describe is due to Apple's ability to design their own chips in custom detail. It makes me wonder if most competitors would find that an impossibility to do? Apple compounds their custom advantage by buying the final product is such huge quantities that their price is likely lower then an off-the-shelf chip.Another thing that Apple's SoC does is communicate with the M7/8 chip which handles all the needed finger print ID and encryption...
If I remember right PA Semi had been able to design ARM chips to be less power hungry that normal, which won them some government contracts before Apple bought them. If so, this would mean that Apple started with a leg up on design. There's no way of knowing if this "edge" brought to the table by PA Semi still is paying off, but I suspect Apple is still leading in processor design for power consumption due to PA Semi's design expertise in power management.One of the other...
Before getting through the last sentence you had be digging my wallet out!!
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