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Posts by d-range

The serial numbers on these memory chips are quite interesting by the way. Normally Hynix uses a numbering scheme where you can deduce the size of a memory chip from the part number, by looking at the leading number before the 'G' character. In hexadecimal, it gives you the number of gigabits on the chip, ie: a 1G = 1 Gigabit, AG = 10 Gigabit, etc. These chips have a '0' in front of the G, which suggests someone does not want us to know the size of the memory on this...
I think it's pretty obvious the iPad 3 will have a souped-up A5 CPU with a better graphics chip, more memory, higher clockspeed, but still dual-core. I don't know why people expect a quad-core A6 this soon already. I expect the A6 to have Cortex-A15 cores (IMO it would be a huge disappointment if it hasn't), and the simple fact is that right now, no-one is making those in volume yet, the first devices with A15 cores are not expected before the second half of 2012. To think...
Almost anybody who uses both OS X and some other *nix OS together, or wants to build and run open-source software not written for OS X, will want to have X11. If not to run X11 apps locally, it's invaluable to run remote X11 applications. I don't mind how it developed or distributed, as long as it doesn't mean X11 will break with every OS X update, and keeps up with modern OS X features to integrate with native Mac apps than plain xorg X11, for example.Not being able to...
Wasn't Apple working on better batteries that would allow higher energy densities and thinner battery packs at the same time? I remember reading about this a while ago.Anyway, I have to agree with SolipsismX. I think it *is* possible to shrink the MBP to MBA-size, and still put a full-blown CPU/GPU combo in it that draws 45W. Removing the ODD will not only increase the chassis volume available for battery packs, but it would also allow a little more flexibility in terms of...
IMO this is a very bad idea. All other arguments aside, outsourcing software development to some overseas company is always a bad idea unless you are outsourcing something so trivial it likely already exists in some form or another. End of story. We all know Apple is not trying to reproduce trivial software, and the quality of their software and API's is instrumental to the success of their hardware. In all the years I've worked as a software engineer I've seen nothing...
I'm not saying there isn't a market for phones like the first Moto Droids, and at that time I think it actually filled a gap in the market. The problem with the Droid phones is that the people it appealed to all bought them right away, which explains why they initially sold a lot of units in no time. There wasn't a whole lot of credible competition in Android land back then anyway. After the target market for the Droid was saturated, every Android geek already had one,...
I'm not sure I'm following you there. Are you implying Moto would have been in such a better state today if they had done a better job at supporting their phones in the past, that they would have been profitable? Because I'm not buying that. Motorola should simply have sold better phones targetted at a broader audience, instead of trying to focus exclusively on geeks that buy on spec sheets and feature checklists. Maybe then they would have sold enough units of fewer...
^ this
It's not a matter of 'can Motorola do it', because obviously they could, provided they throw enough money at it. The question is: 'can Motorola do it and still make a profit on their phone business'. Seeing that they haven't been profitable for about a decade of doing things they way they are doing it now, I'd say: no, Motorola cannot afford to spend enough effort, manpower and money to provide stable OS updates at regular intervals, in a timely fashion, for every phone...
That's cute. The Mitsubishi laptop cost $6000 and was only thinner by half a hairs width when you compare it against the thick end of a MacBook Air, but instead of the MacBook Air, the casing was the same width at all edges. The MacBook Air is wedge-shaped, so not only is it much thinner on average, but it's also thinner if you measure about 1 cm or less from its thickest corner. Also, the statement that the MacBook Air was the thinnest laptop on the market was still...
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