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Posts by Immanuel Goldstein

Contrary to the popular myth, the US and and Israel weren't always so close. Israel had no US help in 1948, actually, the US had an arms embargo on Israel at the time. And the common stand of the Department of State as well as in the Pentagon was rather hostile toward Israel, for the simple reason that it was in the way the policy's priority in the region namely Saudi Arabia (the pretext often given was that Israel with its ruling Labour party and prominent trade-union...
When a country is attacked, its powerful ally is usually commited to come to its defence, that is something that both South Korea and Israel have in common. The difference is that the US fought a war to defend South Korea and has troops stationed there for the purpose of defending South Korea (and a good thing it is). The US has not done the same for Israel. But the thread's initiator asks:Assuming (and giving the benefit of the doubt, I'll guess it was due to ignorance...
An observation of the trends in the last hundred years shows a rapid increase in the number of people in the world who don't consider themsleves religious (seculars/agnostics/atheists, etc.), if I recall correctly that group is third in size behind Islam (and growing faster than Islam, yet not being a religion it cannot claim being “the world's fastest growing” etc.) Observing the last five hundred years, we can see that religion's influence and authority has been in...
True enough about insularity, among other things.
[A most impressive list, I'd say]Or the Apple Macintosh, which more than compensates for those two.“You're not the only country…” although I favour “yours is not the only country…” (I'm afraid I could not help it, sorry). They do know about that, mind you, they simply insist that theirs is the world's most bestest country in the world, but they mean it in a cute rather than an offensive way. I'd say they are somewhat insular, although their “island” is bigger.
Ignorance about geography is commonplace in many countries, but moreso when you live in a big super-poweful country, with only two terrestrial boundaries; then you tend to pay even less attention to the wider world out there. I'm told that a large proportion of Americans don't even travel abroad. According to the CNN article, seven out of ten could tell where China was. So it's not all that hopeless.
I think “y'all” makes more sense.
Name: it begins with an I. Birthday: Some time in late April or early May (yes, thank you) as I use some archaic calendar, the year itself was deep in last century. Astrological sign: Taurus, I think. Mac(s) I own: Currently, a PowerMac G5. Favourite notable person of the Mac community? Douglas Adams was quite notable. Mac(s) name(s): As I found “Macintosh HD” too bland early on, I often rename the volumes according to my mood at the given time. Recent ones:...
My basic approach mimics that of the real world. I prefer to use “vous” when joining a discussion (particularly if I'm new at the particular forum and don't know my interlocutors that well), changing later to “tu” on a case-by-case basis; but if all other participants are already using “tu” as a general rule, which is quite common on the internet, then I address everybody as “tu”. While I found English quite easy and even pleasant to learn, I was at first confused by...
The name “Thomas” sounds close to ”teoma”, Aramaic for “twin”.
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