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Posts by _Rick_V_

  And maybe that's part of the problem.   The problem for Amazon was: "We store all the relevant customer information we need.  How can we make it even easier for future purchases?"  And then from there, it's a relatively straightforward programming exercise.  How does become patentable?!   When Amazon announced this new feature, the world wasn't shocked at such a novel concept (it wasn't). Or that they implemented it, or any of that.  The world was shocked that they had...
    Yes, there is such thing as a Patent Troll.  Google it.   Yes, Amazon's "1-click patent" is a trivial obvious thing.  I don't care what they did to implement it, there's nothing there that suggests "wow, having a customer's billing and shipping on file is a novel idea!"
  Do you live underneath a cell tower?  ;-)
Two comments: 1) In my speed tests, I don't think I ever got 14Mbps download (Chicago area). I would guess that throttling peak downloads is probably not necessary for most parts. 2) "IOS consumes more data" -- yes, back in 2007 & 2008 when compared to other phones at the time, that was true. But today, I doubt an iPhone uses any more data than your average modern Android, given that they have essentially the same apps that live-updates as iOS does. That statement...
  Sounds like you need to do a "restore" on your iPhone.    I've had an issue once (long time ago, on a 3GS) where it was acting flaky.  Took it to the Apple Store and they told me to do that first.  As a matter of fact, it's their version of "take two aspirin and call me in the morning".   Apple's instructions: http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1414
  Of course it does!  For the 5 minutes you're in the bathroom, you're practicing anti-social behavior.  ;-)
Adding my voice to the chorus: "Shake to [something]" is dumb. Hard to use, except for when you didn't want it to. I always turn it off for any given app that supports it.
    As I mentioned originally, I pretty much agree with you.     I was only trying to point out that Apple and Microsoft and others aren't so cavalier about social engineering hacks (and that's a good thing). Take for example:   Every major browser will attempt to block phishing sites automatically via a daily downloaded blacklist, despite the fact that phishing is a classic pure example of social engineering. Apple's Xprotect system will block known trojans found in...
    My mother-in-law would fall for this scam.
    I don't know if I would go as far as calling it completely fallacious.    For example, most malware out there that relies on at least some bit of social engineering (think: phishing sites, or malware that parades as a free program for editing PDF’s).  That doesn’t mean that the browser is absolved of not blocking such phishing sites.  Or the OS from blocking known malware.   That said, in this particular case, I agree that this is a pretty edge-case scenario; unlikely...
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