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Posts by GrangerFX

If there was a slot into which you could  insert a new hardware module, you could upgrade it as frequently as you wanted in order to keep it compatible with the latest iOS versions from Apple. The back end would plug into power and the screen and would not need upgrading. The module would contain the latest Ax processor, RAM, flash storage, cellular technology, WiFi, GPS, motion sensing and so on.
My original iPhone tells me there won't be software upgrades in ten years.
I beg to differ. A physical piece of hardware and software resides in your car in order to receive information via CarPlay and show it on a screen. That won't work in 10 years.
The brains are in the apps in the phone. The apps may not support some ancient version of the protocol. Apple updates everything every year. Each time they update iOS they have to update Apple TV just to keep AirPlay working. Trust me as an app developer, your CarPlay automobile won't be compatible with anything except really old iPhones and iPads in ten years and those won't be compatible with apps or content. For example: Did you know that if you try to play the latest...
However future iOS devices connect to future CarPlay hardware will be different. Apps will be updated to newer versions of iOS and won't support old versions with old CarPlay SDK. Try this: Get a first generation iPhone or iPod touch and try to download some apps from the app store. That device is less than ten years old and is completely incompatible with today's apps. Do you think your ten year old car will fair better?
Without hardware or software upgrades, the chance that CarPlay will be in any way useful in ten years is nil. Ask owners of vehicles with the first generation of OnStar how well that feature is working for them today. When first generation cell phone technology was disabled, OnStar stopped working and GM decided not to provide any kind of upgrade path for owners so the feature they touted so highly as a way to automatically call for emergency services after an accident...
AppleInsider says $90. The original story on the NY Times blog say $99. Amazon says "Duh! What's a Nest Protect?" Frustrating.
Mapping has a lot more to do with data gathering, organization, storage and access (both on and offline) than it has to do with software features. The Mapping software is relatively easy to develop but if your data is not great to begin with, no amount of software design will help. For example, Flyover renders beautiful 3D maps. They are the best 3D city maps I have ever seen. However if you want directions to a particular store in an outdoor mall, Maps will leave you at...
It is always sad when old devices are no longer supported but for developers there is a silver lining: The iPhone 4 will always run iOS 7 for backwards compatibility testing. Apple has very few ways for developers to test their apps on older versions of iOS on physical devices. Good luck trying to buy an old device on eBay that runs a particular version of iOS you want to test. If we don't have a particular device/iOS version combo, we just hope for the best so it is great...
Prior art: This same technique has been used by JPL for the last couple of decades to create super resolution images from mars rovers. Doing the same thing with a smart phone or any other camera is an obvious extension of the original idea. "Super resolution" is even the same name JPL used. I have been looking for ways to use this trick long before this patent and I am less than ordinarily skilled in the art of digital photography.
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