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Posts by Blastdoor

I suspect the capability of these devices to act as diagnostic tools will come first, and the permission to make the claim will come second. 
Engineer-types love nuclear because it's technically sophisticated and, if properly implemented, very appealing from a cost-benefit standpoint. But engineering types don't appreciate the importance of politics and economics in making nuclear work -- they don't know how to fit those variables into their equations, and so they just ignore those variables.  I am aware of only one country in the world that has really made nuclear power work safely, efficiently, and with strong...
Two unrelated thoughts:   1. Rain doesn't fall from heaven. All water is recycled, it's just a question of how the recycling occurs.    2. There may be no large company better positioned for the economic/environmental realities of the 21st century -- particularly in a place like China -- than Apple. I'm really curious to see how this plays out. Will it just be a PR advantage? Will it become a cost advantage? Or will there come a time when Apple is actually making money...
I think camera improvements (both in the camera itself and the SOC) could be the primary thing pushing the iPhone upgrade cycle for the next few years. For me, CPU/GPU has been good enough since the iPhone 5. I bought the 6+ primarily for the camera and the screen. Now I'd say the screen needs no more attention, but the camera could still be better. 
I use Apple Pay about once a week., but I totally believe these stats.    There's a local grocery store in my town that has the NFC terminals, and it does work, but they don't have an ApplePay logo and they don't promote it at all. I've just been holding my iPhone up to every terminal I come across to see where it works and where it doesn't. I've been using my iPhone to pay for purchases at this store since ApplePay went live, yet just last week a cashier there saw me...
Some people might over-emphasize it, but diversification unambiguously has value. Putting a large proportion of one's savings into a single asset is highly risky. I expect Apple to do well, but I don't know with certainty that Apple will do well. There is risk.  It is possible to reduce risk by owning assets whose prices have a low correlation with one another. Trading some expected gains for lower risk make sense for people who have only one life to live. 
I've long wondered if this might be a big issue holding back Apple's stock price.    It's a real problem not just for hedge fund managers but for individual investors for whom AAPL represents a large share of their portfolio. I know it's an issue for me.    This creates an asymmetry between AAPL bulls and bears. The bulls would like to buy more, but they face this diversification constraint. The bears have no analogous constraint.    Perhaps the share buyback program...
This is a good reminder of the risks involved with operating in China. On the one hand it's a huge market which offers the potential for substantial profit growth. On the other hand, it's run by an authoritarian government lacking checks and balances, capable of quickly making capricious decisions that will pull the rug out from under any given company.    My guess is that Apple will capitulate if China ultimately moves forward with this kind of law. It's too hard to...
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