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Posts by Blastdoor

I'm very hesitant to buy anything like this from a company that is small enough to be bought by Google (a la Nest).    There is no way I'm handing the keys to my house over to Google (and whoever the highest bidder is for Google to turn over my information). 
In some sense the problem is that it's actually not that pesky. People no longer feel that the constitution is sufficient to protect them from an overreaching police state.  Of course, it's probably fair to say that people have the government they deserve. Since Nixon (at least), politicians have been using the threat of crime, commies, and terrorists as reasons to weaken people's civil rights and increase police powers. The courts have become stacked with...
 The problem as I see it is that a large fraction of the public, regardless of political affiliation, no longer agrees with the government regarding what is "unreasonable" and what ought to be "lawful." The post 9-11 overreach by the government (all levels and branches, both major political parties) means that the government has lost the consent of a large fraction of the governed.  It will take a very long time to regain that public trust. The first step would be to...
I would like it if Cook's Apple would make a sustained, long-term effort to get Macs into business environments. I think I perceive a greater willingness among corporate IT types to consider supporting Macs than there was 10 years ago. But it's not going to happen without a sustained push from Apple.    I hope this is a step in that direction. 
The iPhone is not the only device that will have an A8. Samsung could be producing A8s for the iPad. In fact, it would make a lot more sense to split the work in that way, since TSMC and Samsung are unlikely to produce chips with exactly the same power and thermal characteristics -- Apple wouldn't want that kind of heterogeneity across units of the same type.  I actually think this story has a lot of credibility. Apple is operating at a scale where it can afford to have...
You may be correct regarding the mobile devices division of Samsung. Its moment in the sun may be drawing to a close. The Chinese are killing them at the low-end and they can't compete with Apple at the high end. It's a very painful squeeze.  But I think for Samsung as a whole (that is, looking beyond the mobile phone division alone), I'd characterize this more as "returning to normal" rather than "jumping the shark." The profits from the mobile phone division have been a...
So Samsung lost a big share of Apple's fab business, thinking that was ok because they'd make more profits selling high-margin smartphones.    Oops. 
I think you're way off. Nvidia has been totally dependent on TSMC. AMD is totally dependent on TSMC for GPUs and totally dependent on GloFo for CPUs. Qualcomm has only recently started using Samsung, and that's mostly because they were forced to do so by Apple when Apple bought up a lot of TSMC's capacity.Simultaneously launching a new CPU design at scale with two different foundries that use different processes is extremely rare. I'd love to hear of a specific example of...
Fascinating… I wonder if any other chip designer uses two foundries at the same time for the same chip. I kind of doubt it given the large investment of time and money to tailor a design to a particular foundry's process. This means that Apple has the foundries competing for its business in a way that no other chip designer does. Everyone else has to deal with a certain amount of lock in with their foundry partner.
The new Core M is way faster, both CPU and GPU.But I'm not sure it matters. Core M is also much more expensive than what apple is likely paying for the A8, and most iphone and iPad users are not cpu constrained.If you're thinking about MacBooks, the A8 is not competitive with Core M.But apple is gaining fast on Intel. It could be that in another two to three years apple might be making SOCs that really could go in a MacBook air
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