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Posts by Blastdoor

 So true. The only thing they've got going for them is that they can claim to be truly platform agnostic, while Apple, Microsoft, and Google will always be suspect in that regard.   Personally, though, I won't trust 1 TB of files to a company that is small enough to be bought out by Google. 
Something people should keep in mind regarding stories like this is that education is a fad-driven field where good ideas are killed through lousy implementation and lack of patience. And IT departments in school districts are typically worse than IT departments in companies (which also aren't that great).   So every time I see one of these stories I get nervous. I think the only way one of these big deployments can work is if Apple has the ability to do a lot more than...
Google's software isn't necessarily free -- you pay for it with the content of every scrap of information that passes through Google's servers. If your information has no value, then sure -- it's free.  iWorks has zero marginal cost for people who already bought Apple hardware. So it's sort of free in that sense. But the limitation is that there are a lot of people in the world who (sad for them) do not use Apple hardware. And yet I must deal with those people.  So I'm...
I took his comment to refer to the fact that Parallels global headquarters is in Seattle. Looking at his profile, he is also in Seattle. 
It's funny -- the existence of things like Parallels, VMware, and Bootcamp gave me the safety net I needed to move (back) to the Mac in 2006. For a while I used Bootcamp to play some PC games I liked, but over time I stopped using it, and now I have no need for it at all.    I wonder how many other people are in my camp -- that is, Windows compatibility provided a safety net to move to the Mac, but that safety net is no longer needed. The answer to that question might...
 You don't have to say it -- I already did. I just think that when Apple and any given individual posting to AI forums disagree about what the best decision is for apple to make (where "best" is defined in terms of what's best for a majority of users, not a specific individual or subgroup), Apple is much more likely to be correct. 
A bigger battery, a faster CPU, and more flash would benefit everybody too. But with every benefit comes a cost. Apple has to find the right mix of benefits and costs. There are no free lunches.  edit -- just to clarify, I'm not arguing whether adding more RAM to the iPhone 6 is the right thing to do or not. It might be, it might not be. I'm arguing that Apple is better positioned to make that decision than anyone here is.  I would also say that many companies are not able...
 There's a difference between saying that Apple is not making a product with the best mix of features *for you* and saying that Apple is not making a product with the best mix of features *for them* (which is closely related to making the best mix of features for the majority of customers). You're well positioned to assess what's best for you -- I'm sure you would benefit from more RAM. But Apple is substantially better positioned to assess what's best for them and/or the...
Does iOS use memory compression like Mavericks? If not, then perhaps the addition of that feature might allow Apple to stick with 1 GB of RAM for longer than they otherwise would have. 
I don't see how it's obvious that Apple was wrong to use 256 MB in the devices where that was used. The fact that Apple ultimately released devices with more RAM doesn't prove that Apple made the wrong choice in the devices that did have 256. The nature of the tradeoffs changes as technology improves. What doesn't make sense today in terms of any given spec -- RAM, clock speed, battery size -- might make sense in 2 years thanks to Moore's Law.  I doubt that anyone would...
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