or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Blastdoor

You appear to be implicitly equating "slick, polished" with "closed, sanitized". I don't think those are equivalent at all. Outside of the EFF, nobody is saying "oooh, check out the rounded, curvy opensourcedness of my laptop!" Consumers don't care about inputs, they care about outputs. The extent to which a product is "open" or "closed" is just one of many inputs. And when it comes to "slick and polished" I think you're more likely to find closed-source inputs than...
I agree. But I suspect that his real gripe here has nothing to do with "censorship" of controversial or sexual content. This sounds like a cover for an open-source type ideology. He's not concerned about consumer freedom, he's concerned about developer freedom. Those aren't exactly the same things. I think Apple has the right approach, because they are putting consumer experience above ideology (or, perhaps consumer experience is their ideology).
Yeah, I agree that clearly someone has to pay. My point is that corporate IT is willing to pay Microsoft, because Microsoft really does cater to them. I am no fan of MS, but I have to admit that they do pay much more attention to the needs of IT than Apple does. Basically, MS can say to IT -- here's a phone that fits in perfectly with all of your other MS-based infrastructure ("ecosystem", if you will). Maybe that's true, maybe it's not, but just as Apple's brand carries a...
I think IT loves MS because IT is MS's primary customer, and so MS treats IT much better than they treat you and me. Seems to me that it breaks down like this -- Google's primary customer is advertisers (with Google, you and I are not the customer -- we're the product). Microsoft has two main clients: OEMs and corporate IT. Apple has one client: consumers (aka, "end-users"). So you see, MS only needs to make a product that is just good enough for consumers to be willing...
It's because MS has incredible sway over corporate IT. You just can't ignore or underestimate that. IT *loves* MS. All MS has to do is create a phone that won't cause users to revolt, and they'll sell a ton of them to corporations. My company's IT group had to be dragged kicking and screaming by the president of the company and several VPs to accept employees using their personal iPhones for work e-mail, and that was only because those top guys flat out refused to use a...
Yup, I think this is mostly what it will be. They might also figure out some solutions to very specific problems, like playing Pandora in the background. But I very much doubt we will see full blown 3rd party app multitasking. I just can't see, for example, putting Monopoly in the background as a running task. It just makes no sense from a performance/battery perspective to allow that, especially since that would provide zero benefit to the user (assuming rapid task...
Not sure I know what point you're trying to make. But even if Pink exists inside Microsoft, that doesn't mean it will become a product. Remember Apple's Pink?
This would appear to contradict the claim from AI that MS was going to sell a "Zune Phone" that's incompatible with WinMo7. Instead, it would appear that they are just going to abandon the old Zune, and make the new Zune a WinMo7 device. That actually makes much more sense -- they are getting their house in order. I continue to believe that MS is a larger competitive threat to Apple than Google. Google is way out of its league here.
Depends. Clearly some people know absolutely nothing, but they're too easy to criticize, so I vote we just ignore them. But then there are people who do know quite a bit about technology and have a very DIY orientation. They might be running a home-built computer with a heavily tweaked Linux distro. These are smart people who know a lot about computer technology. But they are often out of touch with the other 99.9% of the population that does not share their hobby. Those...
There is so much negativity coming from tech-geeks on the web, that it's easy to see how people might find this story difficult to believe. But I think there are several reasons to believe that it could be true. As others have noted, an initial effort to produce 5 million units in the first half of the year does not in any way shape or form mean that they intend to sell 10 million this year. Many of those 5 million will be sold in the second half of the year. And iPads...
New Posts  All Forums: