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Posts by AsianBob

To each his own, in the end I suppose. I understand your view and like you, my phone isn't out of hand's reach most of the time. I just like having the option of being able to do everything from the computer in front of me if possible.You actually raise an interesting point. I would suppose at the very least the app will have to be from the Market, not pushed in from anywhere. Yes, yes, I know of the reports of malware apps in the Market. Second, I might be wrong,...
I was going to respond, but on a second read, your mind is already made up so it'll be like talking to a brick wall. "The eye sees only what the mind is prepared to comprehend." — Henri Bergson
As I've said, if you have the device already in-hand, then all of this is a moot point. The difference is if you happen to be using another device. Say I'm using a friend's computer and come across the app. I can sign in to the Market webstore, buy it and have it shot to my Android device. I don't have to install any additional software onto his computer and I don't need to pull out the device and search again. Personally, I like having options.
I'm currently at work, so I don't have iTunes installed (not allowed). I did follow your link and it eventually led me to the iTunes download page on Apple's website. I have no doubt that your process does what it says it does. But if you were doing this on a separate computer, I'm assuming all it does is open iTunes and download the app? Wouldn't you still need to connect your iDevice to the computer for it to be synced over? If you're doing all of this on the device...
Both of those are things all platforms have to deal with to a certain extent. If anything, there are more and more developers being drawn towards Android. If fragmentation and piracy were as apocalyptic as everyone here makes it out to be for Android, the developers would have fled a long, long time ago.
The advantage comes when you're browsing a site happen to come across a new, cool app being shown. Instead of picking your phone or tablet up, you can have the app installed with a few mouse clicks from the computer you're using already. One of the cooler cloud sync things I've been using is Chrome-to-Phone, which is essentially the same thing. If you're using Google Maps and plan out a route, Chrome-to-Phone will send it to your Android device and automatically start up...
I figured they could do the same. But with their link method, you still have to go the extra step of syncing your iDevice with iTunes before the app actually appears on the device, yes? Google has automated and made the sync wireless for you. That's where the value is added.As for your comment about not wanting apps appear on other devices. It seems the webstore Market allows for you to select/deselect which device you have registered to your Google account to download...
You do know there are numerous videos of Honeycomb in action right?
Think of it this way. You're browsing your favorite tech blog and it mentions a cool app you'd love to have. iOS (option 1): Open iTunes; search for app; purchase/download; find iPhone and sync iOS (option 2): Find iPhone; find app in App Store; purchase/download Android: Link on blog goes directly to webstore Market; purchase; phone/tablet automatically downloads and installs app The point is that with the webstore Market, Android users don't have to stray away too far...
I do believe it came straight from Google's mouths that Honeycomb is optimized to take advantage of however many processor cores you have. Whether it's a single core phone of the present or dual core tablets and phones coming out soon.
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