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Posts by AsianBob

The difference with the Pre is that the Droid is on Verizon, the largest carrier in the US. And that the Droid is released with 12,000 apps backing it, whereas the Pre had none and a bad SDK (from what I've heard) released afterwards, thus its drop in sustained growth later. The Storm was just a buggy device out of the gates (I know; had mine since February), which required a bit more tinkering than normal people wanted to do. And like the Pre, it didn't have the apps to...
Ok, so in that case all iPods (essentially iPhones minus the phone app) running the same OS don't count either, even though they're part of the whole ecosystem. Nor the rumored "Tablet" device. It may be a steep road to climb, but I believe that with Android having a starting base around the world (instead of in the US and then outwards months or even years later). Seeing as the non-US manufacturers release 3 or 4 models apiece yearly, it isn't an impossible road to...
Confusion to who? It's only use techheads who can tell the difference between the actual OS versions. To the average person buying an Android phone, they can't tell if it's running 2.0 or 1.6 or 1.5. Especially if the manufacturer puts a custom GUI on it. To them, all the basic functions work the same and all the apps work the same. What's there to be confused about?
I'm going to have to side with solipsism here on this bet. Android is not just a phone OS. It just happened to get its appearance to the public in the smartphone world. It's an relatively free OS that can be put on nearly anything electronic and be shaped however the manufacturer wants. That's the key here. A few sections down on this article links to others that show just where the Android web has spread out to.http://gizmodo.com/5397215/giz-expla...yline=true&s=x
Neither side should underestimate the other. Google has a lot of untapped potential and is actively creeping into segments of the market other than smartphones. To ignore this puts you in the same boat as the people who ignored the iPhone when it was first displayed to the world. The fact that the iPhone is successful because of certain Google products speaks for itself. The way Android allows the manufacturer of a product to shape the GUI however they like makes it...
That's for sure. RFIDs in the iPhone will be just another reason for those "government's tracking me" nuts. I'm kind of confused about how the GUI would affect if an app would work or not. The custom GUI only changes how the user gets to the app, not the app itself. Additionally, with the Eclair SDK, it's been shown that you can write an app and it'll function as intended, regardless of the resolution, screen size, or GUI for that matter. Shown at the 1:25...
Actually very good points. I guess you can call the iPhones technically 3 models, as they all have different hardware, but run the same OS. But my thought is that Apple is still only a single company and the iPhone itself is still being developed in a vertical approach. There will still only be about 1 new model per year (basing off of Apple's current trend). Android, on the other hand, has pretty much an unlimited amount of models to release per year, depending on the...
Eh. 4 years is a long time, but no company's 100% perfect on their mapping software. Plus I'm sure Google doesn't expect you to blindly follow their directions without stopping at those lights and plow right through.
It's actually a Google thing. Google has much more of the US mapped out in their database than Europe. So they're more confident that their mapping program will work as intended here. Could you imagine what trouble they'd get into if their routing used the incomplete mapping information in Europe and constantly led people around wrong? They're just playing it smart and safe.No idea. But the reasoning they use seems fairly right. Google is playing a numbers game. By...
Yes, limited multitasking. While it's impressive that my Storm can have 20+ apps open at the same time, it eats up memory really quickly. From what I've seen, Android lets you have 6 apps open at the same time. I'm not sure if it automatically does a rolling closing (rhymes!) of apps higher than 6. Most people probably won't have 6 apps open at the same time. 10 is pushing it. Limited multitasking is a good balance between multitasking and making sure there's plenty...
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