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Posts by jmgregory1

Very true about many engineers, however Ford's process had to involve designers too.  Unless MS was telling both teams that what they really wanted wasn't possible (which is likely how things went down), I find their system inexcusably bad.  Chrysler's system, on the other hand, is fantastic.  It's as if they watched the train wreck that was Ford MyTouch and addressed all the negatives, both functionally and visually.  I can't wait to get my new JGC SRT with it.
MS's Sync for Ford is complete crap.  Every time I get a rental Ford, I'm thoroughly disappointed in how it works (or rather, doesn't work).  I just can't believe Ford signed up with MS in the first place.  You would have thought Ford's engineers and marketing folks would have recognized just how bad Sync was the first time they looked at it.  I've even been in an Explorer where the entire system rebooted while I was driving.  Not a great thing when the touch-screen system...
This isn't news - what does anyone think Mark Z. would say in response?  That his company mines data and then sells that data and that you as a FB user are really just a bunch of data to be sold to the anyone and everyone willing to buy it?  If the movie was accurate in its portrayal of the founding of FB, then perhaps Mark didn't initially think of using and selling the data he collected, but clearly that is exactly what has created value for FB.
After writing my post, I quickly tried a shot, which I then noted on another post.  It's not the photographer, but rather the camera settings for the iPhone that are causing the images to appear too dark.  Obviously adjustments can be made after the fact, which I would have thought he would have done, but again, we don't know what he did or didn't do with the images - just that I find them to be rather poor shots in viewing them on the Time site.
Just to do a basic test, I took a shot inside my condo, using HDR on, with my 6+.  I have to say that I think Apple's got the mid-tone levels set too dark.  In iPhoto, I need to lighten up the mid-tones in order to have it look more like what the naked eye sees.  With HDR off, the mid-tones are a bit less pronounced, but still requires lightening to get the photo to look more natural.  I know what I'm trying to do is a bit more complicated as I'm shooting in a dark-ish...
This photographer didn't do something right with the photos.  They're almost all too dark and muddy.  I get that it can be challenging shooting in a building with stone walls, as the light doesn't behave as you expect, but I would not have shown any of those photos to friends, let alone to a magazine.     He didn't note whether he was using HDR or not, but guessing from the shots, he didn't.  Which was a mistake.  I'm sure, as a photographer, he figured he could do...
Code:There is no mystery or ill intent on Apple's part in regard to why they have the data they do on individual products. The simple truth is that when any consumer purchases an Apple product, iPods in this case, if they connect them to a computer and iTunes, then they're automatically registering them with Apple, associated with whatever iTunes account the person has.And for those questioning why they would keep that info for so long, I would question why would they ever...
Thinking that there was something wrong with the iPod Ms. Wilson / Tucker had, she bought iPod after iPod, hoping that each new one would be able to play 17 Real songs she owned...but alas, Apple's monopolistic business practices related to not playing competitors DRM locked file formats, she ended up using each iPod as a paperweight.  
As much as it would be great to have the law firm bringing the suit get its ass kicked for fraud, they'll simply claim their client did not tell them the truth and they'll walk away, a few dollars lighter for what they spent working the bogus case, but that will be about it. The American legal system is rife with fraud and it's difficult to separate and point fingers at either those hiring the attorneys, or the attorneys themselves.
GTAT thought they had to make big promises in order to secure an order from Apple, which is in all likelihood, true. It's a classic, "be careful what you wish for" scenarios, where getting what you think you want can be the thing that kills you. I've worked hard over the past decade building a product that most people though was impossible and the thing I heard over and over was "Go get the orders, to prove the product is something people want", as if selling the product...
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