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Posts by jmgregory1

I agree that we all, myself included, find it easier to point out the problems than come up with a viable positive solution. The problem is this, for me at least - RIM has been "staying the course" for the past few years and as much as their new OS has promised relevancy when it releases, they've not been able to hit release dates for just about anything, hardware or software related. If you're a share holder and you hear that they're sticking to plan, the next question...
My former Canadian partner was constantly having problems with his BB - their first iteration with a touch screen, but he still supported them. I can understand that - they created something no one else had at the time and they really were top of the game for years. The problem is they didn't recognize that other companies were going to catch up and quickly pass them. You hate to say it, but they were a one-trick pony. They lived and are dying by their mobile email...
If I were a shareholder, I'd punish them further for being so arrogant even in the end. They drove so much value and talent out of the company that it's almost criminal. I'm sure RIM will continue on, but any further missteps is going to sink the ship. Anyone want to place bets on whether they'll meet timelines for new os and products?
This is what I was told when I had a deal to do a store within a store at Target. The company owners, who incidentally didn't shop at Target (urban metro people with no kids and rich taste) , thought it would potentially hurt the brand and disrupt company stores. They were idiots and had no idea how beneficial it would have been to have 50+ million people walking by their brand. The Target customer is the Apple customer - it's a natural fit. The last time I was at a...
RIM should join up with Sears Holdings. I'd love to hear the co-ceo's explanation for offering this strategy. If it weren't for the moronic wall streeters who stay invested in the company (and the corporate IT departments not wanting to change), RIM would be on the chopping blocks already. Investors are going to give them 2012 to bring better and successful products to market - which they won't of course. Then what? I think as much as RIM is floundering (as is Sears),...
As much as people have resisted the acquisition, DT was the one selling the business unit. You have to question what they will do with a money losing business? I would bet that without a friendly acquisition by someone else, chances are good that they'll go away - which doesn't help consumer choice at all. Maybe it will be good to get rid of them and let ATT just buy up their bandwidth.
I would argue that Apple hasn't sewn up the high-end laptop market, but rather has convinced people that a product like the mba is a better value than a cheap netbook or even a cheap laptop. For that matter, it's already been shown to offer better specs at lower prices than the competition - something that seems to escape those that offer up that Apple only sells overpriced products. As far as the iPad goes - again, it's not a high end market or high end product...it IS...
If the analyst is comparing the mba to netbooks, when stating that "Apple's first mover advantage and optimized feature set and form factor command a higher price that early adopters, productivity users, and Apple enthusiasts are willing to absorb.", then he would correctly be pointing out why a $1000-$1500 mba is doing well compared to netbooks. But if the comparison is related to ultrabooks, as it should be in comparing apples to apples, or as close as possible (and...
I would be willing to make a bet - that Meg will end up making the same decision that Leo made with their computer business - although she'll do a better job of marketing her decision as being positive. This "decision" on the future of WebOS is a not a decision at all - at least in how it's being portrayed. Unless there is some underlying "plan" for tossing the software out as open source that will benefit HP that I'm missing... Are they hoping that it gets fully...
The only thing going for him in putting a definitive timeline on this "transition" is that the tech market, like the financial market, forgets what people have said in the past. 6 months may as well have been 6 years or 6 days. Funny thing is, the only player that seems to be right more than not - is Apple. For Schmidt to be right, so many things would have to happen - things that Google and their product partners have no control over - like getting consumers who have...
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