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Posts by SockRolid

 We'll only know for certain when one of these two things happens: 1. Apple actually announces "iWatch" at some as-yet-unannounced near-future event, or2. Jim Dalrymple says either "Yup." or "Nope." to the "sooner than expected" rumor. Whichever happens first.
"Interstitial?" "Pre-roll?"? Sounds a whole lot like TV ads to me. The first time I saw that initial Nissan Leaf iAd, I thought "That looks like a TV ad." I'm convinced iAd was designed for TV from day one.
I wonder if there will be a 5.5-inch "jumbo iPod touch..."
 And if investors act as they always do, AAPL should dip during or after the iPhone announcement.Then it'll gradually recover over a few months, especially after the October earnings call.Happens nearly every time.  Not because of any particular business logic.Just because of the old saying: "Buy on rumor, sell on news."
"Wall huggers? My ass." - Phil Schiller, September 9 2014
'Internet of Toaster-Fridges' is more likely.
About a year ago, BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit in the SF area) stations were plastered with Galaxy ads. All gone the last time I rode BART, which was some time in June. Maybe Samsung's marketing group ran out of money.  (Yeah, right.)
 Agree.  Never tried either Uber or Lyft, and can't remember the last time I took a taxi locally.  (Mid-90s maybe?) Can't wait until the day when I can buy a car with CarPlay built-in.  Some time next year, I hope.Already have the make and model picked out, along with color and options.  Hopefully with European delivery.
Apparently Uber and Lyft are in a deathmatch for control of the post-taxi driving service. At least in SF, anyway. And they're also apparently crushing traditional taxi service. 10 Ads That Show What A Circus The War Between Uber And Lyft Has Become http://www.sfgate.com/default/article/10-Childish-Ads-That-Show-The-Dramatic-War-5686268.php Fine. I'll keep my cars, thank you very much. (And maybe I'll call Zipcar for the occasional too-late-to-ride-BART scenario.)
I remember when HP was considered one of the very best places to work in Silicon Valley.  Their managers practiced "management by walking around," they had great benefits, they had one of the first campus-like headquarters, and all that.   But no, I never heard of any super-good HP products.  Aside from their RPN calculators and scientific / medical equipment.  Their software just never made much of an impression, and apparently that's still true.
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