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Posts by davida

That's not as simple to answer as you might think, so I'll start with the known facts. The best source of current information on this is from Wikipedia and Ananandtech.com:http://www.anandtech.com/show/7049/intel-thunderbolt-2-everything-you-need-to-know A Falcon Ridge Thunderbolt 2 controller, which drives two Thunderbolt 2 connectors, is connected to the CPU with 4 PCIe lanes, AKA x4 PCIe. The cylinder Mac Pro should have 3 Falcon Ridge controllers. Therefore, the total...
The thing that is really frustrating about the cylinder Mac Pro is that they wasted a lot of time and money on a cool piece of industrial design for a computer architecture that is fundamentally flawed, constrained, inflexible, and will soon be obsolete. And because of the expense, they won't make the small investment for some time in a nice but pragmatic rectangular box that customers actually need.     For most of those making workstation buying decisions, I'm afraid...
It's not allowed to have Thunderbolt outputs without display output. intel tightly controls Thunderbolt, all designs have to be approved by intel, or they won't sell you parts. This is why you don't see Thunderbolt PCIe cards for Windows machines. Here's the application form for Thunderbolt devices (note they only approve certain categories of devices):Thunderbolt Developers ApplicationAlso note the 10,000-unit minimum, and other restrictions.
Not possible. The 7 display outputs (6 Thunderbolt + HDMI) requires two GPUs.
I disagree. First, realize that Thunderbolt 2 has the same bandwidth as Thunderbolt, it just allows aggregation of the bandwidth into a single channel, equivalent to a x4 slot. The power is limited to 9.9 watts, so, for example, you need a power brick for a fiber channel adapter (like the Promise SANLink). Add a case, power brick and Thunderbolt cable, and the price goes up by $100 minimum for any expansion.
Obsolete the day it ships. Thunderbolt is perfect for a Thunderbolt display, but not much else. The use of 6 Thunderbolt connectors requires two GPUs, how many current Mac Pros ship with two GPUs? This is a badly constrained design.
  My iPhone 5S was stolen...
The amount of RAM isn't a big price difference, but it does suggest which GPU is being used. There is a pattern that one can notice about AMD desktop and FirePro GPUs. GPUs don't support a wide range of memory configurations, in part because everything is done 'wide', a GPU is highly parallel compared to a CPU. But desktop GPU cards are sometimes available in 2 RAM configurations, i.e. 1GB or 2GB. With FirePro cards, they always come in one configuration, presumably the...
Thermal pads are obsolete, they wouldn't conduct enough heat away from the chips. Thermal paste can and should be a very thin layer. If you want to get an idea of how it's used, see these instructions: http://www.arcticsilver.com/instructions.htm I can assure you that thermal paste is being used, it's a requirement for the Xeon and the GPUs. It's possible they are using a heat spreader like a copper block between the chip and the aluminum core heat sink, but you would...
I guess I should clarify this. When I say there must be 2 GPUs, I mean the Thunderbolt-instead-of-PCIe design decision dictates 2 GPUs. And regarding the Apple web page, it states that the Mac Pro has two workstation GPUs with up to 6GB memory, but I hope this isn't the only configuration. It would bump up the minimum system price quite a bit if two W9000s/6GB were the only option.   Another way of looking at it: It's an inflexible design.
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