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Posts by hmm

Ah damn you are correct. I must be senile now.
AT&T wasn't actually Cingular. AT&T still had its own service at the time. They acquired Cingular. I still don't see it happening in the near future. If it became incredibly cheap to implement and phone companies were willing to bundle data service across all devices, it might make sense. As it is the wifi thing I mentioned last time covers most circumstances where a person would reach for their laptop rather than their phone.
 You shouldn't have to check something like that. In the unlikely event that you had malware of some kind, that can be solved by restoring your files from a backup. On a side note, never pay for out of warranty repairs from a third party authorized reseller if you have any kind of access to an Apple Store. Depot repair is much cheaper.
I suggest a batman one. At least that's what I will add to my next notebook.
 You clearly missed the point of their political posturing. The typical claim is one that companies are held back from investing in domestic infrastructure due to tax policy. It won't work out that way, but if they were honest about the legislation, most people would not be in support of it.
It wouldn't actually be that high anyway, even in the worst possible scenario. As you know there are adjustments, including credit of any tax paid to a foreign government, as long as all filings for overpayment were completed. They do need to make a decision on how to handle this kind of thing going forward, but it's mainly the tax holiday lobbying that angers me. If they're going to change tax laws, they should do so and be done with it, not simply reset the...
 You may not realize this, but you are incorrect. You are mistaking ideological points of what you think should be taxable with current tax law. The money itself doesn't have to reside outside of the US. The stipulation is that it's held by non-US subsidiaries and considered to be perpetually invested outside the US (oddly that includes being held within the US by non-US subsidiaries). Now your suggestion is that it shouldn't be taxable, because it was earned outside the...
http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887323301104578255663224471212 That has been contested many times. The argument for a repatriation holiday was typically based around lobbying where the largest corporations claimed that funds were tied up, which might otherwise be used to build infrastructure. This is not typically the case, as smaller businesses that are more likely to have that kind of problem are less likely to be able to afford such elaborate accounting. Money...
They already do that via foreign tax credits. That's why I refer to the 35% number as clueless nonsense. I would point out that part of the reason for the gap in wealth isn't the rich paying taxes on income. Some taxes actually shake out in weird ways, but toward the top most of their money is made by appreciation of assets. With things such as real estate, it can be taxed as income if they sell something within two years. If they sit on it long enough, it's taxed as...
 Many of them actually keep quite a bit of it in US banks, even if it's "held" by a foreign subsidiary. Keeping their cash in dollars ensures a stable basis when it comes to earnings reports. The 35% figure is also inaccurate. You might want to look up foreign tax credits. That alone (excluding other adjustments) means that is 35% minus whatever was paid in tax to a foreign government, assuming they filed for refunds of overpayment where applicable. Credits are different...
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