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Posts by vvswarup

I was waiting for someone to try and pin this on Apple. How exactly is Apple responsible for this? And also, what legal ramifications do you foresee? I've got news for you. The NY Post is a business. It made a business decision to charge for content. There's nothing illegal about that.
I've said it a thousand times already. At the end of the day, the bottom line is the only number that matters. So far, Apple is winning where it matters: profitability.
Tell me about it! Everyone who likes to trot out Android's leading market share should remember that at the end of the day, the amount of profits you make is the only thing that matters. I was talking to a family friend a couple of months ago and he suggested that I sell my Apple stock because of Android's popularity. He said that as Android's market share grows, that would put a dent in Apple's profits. Boy am I glad I didn't listen to him. I know in the future to never...
It's called business! As a consumer, it's your responsibility to decide if the product you're getting is worth the money you're paying for it. If you don't like it, choose another product. No one is forcing you to buy an iPad.
The UI looks nice. Ever since I saw WP7, I have always felt that it is highly underrated. But what we've seen so far is a graphical overlay. Until Microsoft demonstrates Windows 8 on an actual piece of hardware in person, Windows 8 is nothing more than vaporware. Frankly, I don't get why companies announce/preview a product when they have no intention of releasing it in the next couple of months or so. Actually, scratch that, I do understand why. Companies can use this...
Get that stuff out of here! Those companies went public so they could raise more capital, simple as that. If companies think that "financial advisors" are only interested in profits and they don't care about good products, they shouldn't have gone public in the first place. You can't have the cake and eat it at the same time. Also, a company's job is to make profits. Face it, pal. If you were in their position (financial advisors), you would also look for profits.
Get off your high horse and read the post! The kid was getting parts from Apple's manufacturing partners and selling them. They carried the Apple logo and branding.
Wilt Chamberlain had it right: "No one roots for Goliath." Back in the day, everyone hated on Microsoft. Microsoft was Goliath. It threw its weight around. Everybody else was a little guy trying his hardest to take down the big, bad Goliath. Apple has become that company now. It has gotten so big and successful that everything it does is "mean, unfair, and anticompetitive," never mind that everybody else is doing the same stuff. Foxconn has plenty of customers...
Apple is not overriding anything. Minimum length warranty is probably required. However, the manufacturer can set conditions under which that warranty will be honored, and that's exactly what Apple is doing.
Enterprise users can run their own "private app store" only if the apps will be used internally. The rationale is simple. Apple develops and maintains the App Store infrastructure. Developers get to make money off of the public using apps hosted on the App Store. As far as Apple is concerned, developers are making money off of the public using a platform wholly owned by Apple. In my opinion, it is Apple's right to set limitations on how its App Store is used. Enterprise...
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